2014 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
Oral Sessions
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(Please Note the Following: 1. The Presenter of each paper is in BOLD type immediately following the paper title. Co-authors are then listed in parentheses. 2. All abstracts in a session can be accessed using the Session Title link.

= presentation powerpoints | = session abstract

CONFERENCE OPENING PLENARY SESSION

Monday / November 3 / 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Mark Dunning

C. Mark Dunning
President, American Water Resources Association
CDM Smith, Palmyra, VA

Lisa Engelman

Lisa B. Engelman
Conference Chair
Booz Allen Hamilton. Rockville, MD

Galloway

Gerald E. Galloway
Conference Technical Program Co-Chair
University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Betsy A. Cody
Conference Technical Program Co-Chair
Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC

Keynote Speaker

 

Kathryn Sullivan

 

Dr. Kathryn Sullivan
Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator, Washinton, DC

NOAA: Taking on Water Resource Challenges with Environmental Intelligence

 

 

Monday / November 3 / 10:30 AM - 12:00


Plenary Panel Session: "21st Century Water Resource Challenges"

Jerry Delli Priscoli

Moderator - Dr. Jerry Delli Priscoli
Senior Adviser on international water issues at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Institute for Water Resources, Washington, DC

Panelists:

Major General John Peabody

Major General John Peabody
Deputy Commanding General for Civil and Emergency Operations, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washinton, DC

Lynn Scarlett

Lynn Scarlett
Managing Director of Public Policy, The Nature Conservancy, Washington, DC

John Anderson

John Anderson
Staff Director, House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment, U.S. House of Representatives, Washinton, DC

George S. Hawkins
General Manager, District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority, Washinton, DC

Flood risk. Climate Change. Population growth. Long-term drought. Mega storms. Aquatic species decline. Emerging contaminants. Public health and safety. Conflicting laws and regulations. You name it, there is no shortage of challenges facing today's water resource professionals. At this session you will hear from some of the Nation's pre-eminent leaders in water resources management and policy. Hear from leaders who have their fingers on the pulse of the federal government's largest water resource management agencies, are involved in crafting water resources policy at many levels, and are responsible for managing water in the Nation's Capital. They will help kick off our symposium by discussing some of the Nation's most challenging current and future water resource issues and efforts to address those issues. Brief remarks from these leaders will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Dr. Jerry Delli Priscoli, U.S. ASCE, IWR, with questions taken from the audience.


 

Monday / November 3 / 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Moderator - Carol R. Collier
Academy of Natural Sciences at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA

Panelists:
Nathan Boon, William Penn Foundation, Program Officer, Watershed Protection, Philadelphia, PA
Roland Wall, The Academy of Natural Sciences, Director, Center for Environmental Initiatives, Drexel, University, Philadelphia, PA
Peter Howell, The Open Space Institute, Exec. Vice President of Conservation Finance and Research, New York, NY
Rachel Dawson, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), Manager Delaware River, Washington, DC
Peter Lane, Institute of Conservation Leadership, Director of Programs, Takoma Park, MD

Over 50 NGOs and other organizations from across PA, NY, NJ, and DE have come together to prioritize improving water quality in the Delaware River Watershed through the restoration and protection of priority landscapes. Their approach involves picking eight strategically targeted clusters of sub-watersheds, developing shared plans that align conservation work within those clusters, and measuring the impact of the work on water quality.

In total, the eight cluster plans identify $230 million needed for conservation, restoration, outreach, and monitoring to make measurable headway on water quality over the next three years. The goal is not only to improve water quality within the selected watershed clusters, but to replicate the results and lessons learned in other sub-watersheds across the Delaware Basin and beyond. The William Penn Foundation (WPF) has already invested $35 million towards this work, including efforts to permanently protect more than 30,000 acres that are critical for clean water; implement more than forty restoration projects that will improve local water quality and provide replicable models for others; and develop long-term water quality data for the watershed.

The panel will consist of representatives from the five major organizations responsible for coordinating the work of over 50 partners: the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, the Open Space Institute, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the Institute of Conservation Leadership, and the William Penn Foundation. Each panel member will provide a short summary of their organization's perspective with the majority of time available for questions and dialog.

Moderator - Tamara Newcomer Johnson
National Sea Grant Office, Silver Spring, MD

Panelists:

Dana Kolpin, Research Hydrologist and Head of the Emerging Issues in Water Quality Project, U.S. Geological Survey, Iowa City, IA

Laura Kammin, Pollution Prevention Extension Specialist with Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Toolkit, Urbana, IL

Kristi Henderson, Acting Assistant Director of the American Veterinary Medical Association's (AVMA) Scientific Activities Division, Schaumburg, IL

Jennifer Lam, Watershed and Invasive Species Education Research Analyst, Oregon Sea Grant, Corvallis, OR

AWRA has featured the science, discovery, monitoring, fate, treatment and possible ecosystem impacts of chemicals of emerging concern (CEC's). Researchers studying CEC's often express the needs to address the importance of the social dimensions to pollution prevention. This panel examines trends in the education, outreach, social and policy dimensions to pollution prevention for an emerging group of contaminants--pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and their mixtures detected in water resources. While pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) help people and animals live healthier lives, their use comes with unforeseen consequences when they enter waters and watersheds through excretion and disposal. Studies in North America and abroad have identified pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in rivers, lakes, coastal waters, groundwater, sewage wastewater, landfill leachate, soils, air, and plant and animal tissues. The effects of PPCPs are different from conventional pollutants. Pharmaceuticals are purposefully designed for bioactivity and therapy at low concentrations. There is growing scientific evidence that even the low concentrations of PPCPs currently detected in US waterways can have unintended adverse effects on aquatic organisms. Some of the PPCP contaminants are known endocrine disruptors, possible human carcinogens, or contribute to antibiotic resistance. Human excretion and disposal through flushing into the wastewater stream, animal feed lots, pets, aquaculture and septic systems are key sources discharging pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Wastewater treatment technologies can remove some pharmaceuticals from wastewater, but these technologies are expensive to build and operate and they often lag the development of new classes of drugs. Survey-based studies in California and France indicate that between 40-50% of all prescribed and over-the-counter medications purchased by consumers go unused. Although only 10-30% of this unused portion is reportedly flushed, drug take-back programs, while helpful, are a limited solution. This presents a growing potential future risk to water resources, as these unused medicines accumulate with existing consumers and the demand for pharmaceuticals is increasing with an aging demographic. Educating consumers and health care professionals about more effective PPCP use and methods to generate less PPCP waste, in part through proper disposal of pharmaceuticals, are important strategies for reducing PPCP flows into watersheds. However, current practices mostly emphasize ecologically friendly ways to dispose of unwanted PPCP's vs. source reduction. From a PPCP product lifecycle perspective, current programs emphasize the downstream "Discharge and Disposal" stage, without fully understanding the upstream production and prescription stage, driving "Uses" that create these PPCP flows. Our panel will also examine barriers to developing state and nationwide PPCP pollution prevention strategies, and actions. Leadership is needed for product stewardship and there are questions regarding who is financially responsible. Social analysis of the consumers and health care professionals that contribute to PPCP flows may help us to identify additional and/or better points to control or reduce the discharge and disposal of pharmaceuticals. Incorporating social science and education can enhance ecotoxicology research and help prioritize monitoring of water resources based on human decision points and triggers to behaviors.

Moderator - Venkataramana Sridhar
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

Historical and Future Hydrologic Change in the Conterminous United States - Bibi Naz, Oak Ridge Nation Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (co-authors: S. Kao, M.Ashfaq, R. Mei, R. Deeksha, L. C. Bowling)
Climate Change, Western Agriculture, and Water Policy - Denise Fort, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Shifting Regional Water Balances under Climate Change: Implications for Agricultural Adaptation - Marcel Aillery , USDA/ERS, Washington, DC (co-authors: E. Marshall, M. Aillery, S. Malcolm, R. Williams)
Climate Change Effects on Water Allocation in the Western US - Gordon McCurry, Geomega Inc, Boulder, CO

Moderator - Jae Ryu
University of Idaho, Boise, ID

Watershed Infiltration Capacity as an Alternative Restoration Strategy for Recovering Urban Stream Ecosystem Function - Rosemary Fanelli, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (co-authors: K. Prestegaard, S. Filoso, M. Palmer)
Engineered Ecosystems, a Cyborg Approach to Ecosystem Restoration - Grand Lake St. Marys Littoral Wetland Restoration - Joseph Pfeiffer, KCI Technologies Inc., Raleigh, NC
Expanding Puerto Rico's Renewable Energy Efforts - The Redevelopment of the Lago Loiza Hydroelectric Facility - Rafael E. Frias, III, Black & Veatch, Sunrise, FL (co-authors: R. Boyce, I. Botero, A. Quinones, L. Ramirez)
An Evaluation of the Cost-Effectiveness of Floating Treatment Wetlands in Assisting in TMDL Reductions - David Sample, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (co-authors: C. Bell, C. Wang)

Moderator - Noel Gollehon
USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Beltsville, MD

U.S. Irrigated Agriculture: The Challenge for a Sustainable Future - Glenn Schaible, Economic Research Service - USDA, Washington, DC
Determinants of Farmer Deficit Irrigation Choices - Steven Wallander, USDA Economic Research Service, Washington, DC (co-author: K. Strzepek)
How to Improve Agricultural Water Productivity: Looking for Water in the Agricultural Productivity and Efficiency Literature - Susanne Scheierling, World Bank, Washington, DC (co-author: D. Treguer)
Evaluating the Impacts of Growing Bioenergy Crops on Water Supply and Quality in the Red River of the North Basin - Zhulu Lin, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND

Evaluation of USDA CropScape Cropland Data Layer for Water Resources Management in Northeast Florida - Sandra Fox, St Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL

Moderator - Babkir Ali
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Stormwater Infrastructure Data Development and Uses - An Overview for Municipalities - Brent Reeves, KCI Technologies, Sparks, MD
WaDE: An Interoperable Data Exchange Network for Sharing Water Planning and Use Data - Sara Larsen, Western States Water Council, Murray, UT (co-author: D. Young)
Implementing Stormwater Projects in Fairfax County - Challenges and Opportunities - Dipmani Kumar, DPWES, Fairfax County, Fairfax, VA (co-author: M. J. Meyers)
USGS Flood Information Website: a National Resource for Current and Past Flood Information - Todd Koenig, US Geological Survey, Rolla, MO

 

Monday / November 3 / 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Moderator - Shannon E. Cunniff
Deputy Director, Water Program Environmental Defense Fund, Washington, DC

Panelists:

Kara E. Reeve
Manager, Climate-Smart Communities Program, National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC
Todd S. Bridges
Senior Research Scientist, Environmental Science US Army Engineer Research and Dev. Ctr.
Vicksburg, MS
Shara Murdock
Climate Change Program Manager, The Nature Conservancy

This panel session, composed of representatives of three national NGO's and the Corps of Engineers, will present cutting edge tools for incorporating natural and nature-based infrastructure to reduce floods and other risks exacerbated by climate change. Topics to be covered include: how the Corps evaluated ecosystem goods and services derived from natural infrastructure in the wake of Super Storm Sandy, new apps developed by TNC for evaluating the effectiveness of natural infrastructure under various scenarios, experiences with natural infrastructure's effectiveness and costs, EDF's innovative approaches to scale up natural and nature-based solutions. Presenters will also address further steps needed to accelerate adoption rates.

Moderators - Jennifer Lam & Samuel S. Chan
Oregon Sea Grant, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

Panelists:

Sam Chan, Watershed Health and Aquatic Invasive Species Specialist with Oregon Sea Grant, Corvallis, OR

Marti Martz, Senior Coastal Outreach Specialist with PA Sea Grant, Undo the Great Lakes Chemical Brew Collection Events, Erie, PA

Dr. Russell F. Mankes, Retired Professor/Chemical Hygiene Officer, Department of Environmental Health & Safety, Albany Medical Center, Albany, NY

Cynthia Finley, Director of Regulatory Affairs for the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA), Washington, DC

AWRA has featured the science, discovery, monitoring, fate, treatment and possible ecosystem impacts of chemicals of emerging concern (CEC's). Researchers studying CEC's often express the needs to address the importance of the social dimensions to pollution prevention. This panel examines trends in the education, outreach, social and policy dimensions to pollution prevention for an emerging group of contaminants--pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and their mixtures detected in water resources. While pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) help people and animals live healthier lives, their use comes with unforeseen consequences when they enter waters and watersheds through excretion and disposal. Studies in North America and abroad have identified pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in rivers, lakes, coastal waters, groundwater, sewage wastewater, landfill leachate, soils, air, and plant and animal tissues. The effects of PPCPs are different from conventional pollutants. Pharmaceuticals are purposefully designed for bioactivity and therapy at low concentrations. There is growing scientific evidence that even the low concentrations of PPCPs currently detected in US waterways can have unintended adverse effects on aquatic organisms. Some of the PPCP contaminants are known endocrine disruptors, possible human carcinogens, or contribute to antibiotic resistance. Human excretion and disposal through flushing into the wastewater stream, animal feed lots, pets, aquaculture and septic systems are key sources discharging pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Wastewater treatment technologies can remove some pharmaceuticals from wastewater, but these technologies are expensive to build and operate and they often lag the development of new classes of drugs. Survey-based studies in California and France indicate that between 40-50% of all prescribed and over-the-counter medications purchased by consumers go unused. Although only 10-30% of this unused portion is reportedly flushed, drug take-back programs, while helpful, are a limited solution. This presents a growing potential future risk to water resources, as these unused medicines accumulate with existing consumers and the demand for pharmaceuticals is increasing with an aging demographic. Educating consumers and health care professionals about more effective PPCP use and methods to generate less PPCP waste, in part through proper disposal of pharmaceuticals, are important strategies for reducing PPCP flows into watershed. However, current practices mostly emphasize ecologically friendly ways to dispose of unwanted PPCP's vs. source reduction. From a PPCP product lifecycle perspective, current programs emphasize the downstream "Discharge and Disposal" stage, without fully understanding the upstream production and prescription stage, driving "Uses" that create these PPCP flows. Our panel will also examine barriers to developing state and nationwide PPCP pollution prevention strategies, and actions. Leadership is needed for product stewardship and there are questions regarding who is financially responsible. Social analysis of the consumers and health care professionals that contribute to PPCP flows may help us to identify additional and/or better points to control or reduce the discharge and disposal of pharmaceuticals. Incorporating social science and education can enhance ecotoxicology research and help prioritize monitoring of water resources based on human decision points and triggers to behaviors.

Moderator - Nicole Carter
Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC

Climate Ready Water Utilities: Helping the Water Sector Prepare for and Adapt to a Climate Change - Curt Baranowski, US EPA, Washington, DC
Impacts of Climate Change and Extreme Weather Events On Hydrology and Land Use in Southfork Watershed, IA - Miae Ha, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (co-author: M. Wu)
Understanding Resilience: Implications for Water Resources Design - Joseph Daraio, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ

Moderator - Betsy Cody
Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC

An Assessment of Nonpoint Pollution Sources in Washington State - Paul J. Pickett, Washington State Dept. of Ecology, Olympia, WA
Utilizing Vacant Lands to Address Ecosystem Service Deficiencies - Adam Ganser, Biohabitats, Inc., Baltimore, MD (co-author: A. Ganser)
The Concept and the Practice: Key Lessons on Ecosystem Services from Practitioners at the Urban Scale - Jennifer Richkus, RTI International, Washington, DC (co-author: M. Barber)
Alternative Technologies for New Indirect Potable Reuse Applications in Florida - Tara VanEyk, Hazen And Sawyer, Hollywood, FL (co-authors: B. D. Stanford, J. Page, P. J. Cooke, E.Vadiveloo, )

Moderator - Dave Gilbey
Aquatic Informatics, Inc., Vancouver, BC, Canada

Communicating Hydrometric Data Quality: What, How & Why - Stuart Hamilton, Aquatic Informatics, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Discrete vs. Continuous Samples: A Discussion on Differences between These Two Data Types and Potential Approaches for Sharing These Data - Dwane Young, U.S. EPA, Washington, DC (co-author: J. Pollak)
FloodWise: A Flash Flooding Emergency Management Tool - Christopher J. Heyer, Aquatics Informatics, Inc. Vancouver, BC, Canada (co-authors: R. McGlinn, E. Caswell, C. Mission)
Retrieving High-Resolution Root-Zone Soil Moisture from Remotely Sensed Surface Soil Moisture, Multispectral Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Imagery, and Data Mining Algorithms - Leila Hassan-Esfahani, Utah Water Research Laboratory, Logan, UT (co-authors: A. Torres-Rua, A. Jensen, M. McKee)

Moderator - Martha Narvaez
University of Delaware, Newark, DE

Collaborative Modeling in the Yakima River Basin: Exploring Potential Market-Based Water Reallocation in the Yakima River Basin - Allyson Beall King, School of the Environment, Washington State University, Pullman, WA (co-author: M. Thornton)
Assessment Groundwater Potentiality of Hard Rock Aquifers along Qift-El-Quseir Road, Eastern Desert, Egypt - Mohamed Saber, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA (co-authors: M.Shaban, A. Sefelnasr, A..A. Bakheit, E.Habib)
Sao Paulo Shared Vision Planning - Richard Palmer, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Amherst, MA (co-authors: S. Falconi, W. Werick)
Integrated Management of Groundwaters in Mountain Areas- Zlatibor Mountain Case Study (Western Serbia, Europe) - Djuro Milankovic, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia (co-authors: A. Vranjes, B. Doncev, D. Milenic)



Tuesday / November 4 / 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Concurrent Sessions 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

Moderator - John C. Peck
University of Kansas School of Law, Lawrence, KS

Panelists:

John C. Peck, University of Kansas School of Law, Lawrence, KS
50 Years of Evolving Water Law and Management in the US - Kansas

James R. May, Widener Environmental Law Center, Widener University, Wilmington, DE
50 Years of Evolving Water Law and Management in the U.S. - Delaware

Irma S. Russell, University of Montana School of Law, Missoula, MT
50 Years of Evolving Water Law and Management in the US - Montana

Burke Griggs, Office of the Kansas Attorney General, Topeka, KS
50 Years of Evolution in Interstate Water Litigation and Management

American water law and policy vary from state to state, region to region. For the most part, water allocation law is state law, not federal law, although federal law comes into play in regard to water on federal lands and Indian reservations and in Federal reservoirs. Eastern states generally employ the riparian doctrine for streams. Western states use the prior appropriation doctrine. Several groundwater allocation doctrines create a patchwork across the country. These doctrines have undergone many changes over the last 50 years-increasing legislative regulation in the east, and changes in the west derived from the Public Trust Doctrine, environment and wildlife concerns, and the need to preserve instream flows. Creation of critical groundwater areas in some western states attempts to slow depletion of groundwater. States share river basins, which has led to interstate water disputes with states entering into interstate water compacts or seeking resolution in the U.S. Supreme Court or Congress. One way to learn about these differences and developments is to hear about experiences in specific states in different parts of the country. This special session will include four speakers. Three speakers will describe 50-years of the legal aspects of water resources management in their respective states. The fourth speaker will discuss interstate water conflicts. Panel moderator John Peck, professor of law at the University of Kansas School of Law, will begin with a brief overview of U.S. hydrology and geography and the various water law doctrines employed for rivers and groundwater. Law professor James May of Delaware's Widener University School of Law will describe water allocation law in Delaware, a small eastern state that borders the Delaware River, the Delaware Bay, and the Atlantic Ocean. Professor Peck will cover the water allocation law of Kansas, a large, great plains state located on the borderline between the eastern, precipitation-rich states and the western, arid states. His primary focus will be groundwater management issues in the vast High-Plains Aquifer due to the extensive use of groundwater in western Kansas. Describing water law developments in the large mountain state of Montana will be Irma Russell, past-dean and now professor at the University of Montana School of Law. Montana has mountain streams, large rivers, groundwater, extensive Federal land holdings, and Indian reservations. Lastly, Burke Griggs, Consulting Professor at the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford University and a special assistant attorney general for the State of Kansas, will provide insight into the resolution of disputes in several interstate river basins across the country.

Moderator - Janice Fulford
U.S. Geological Survey, Stennis Space Center, MS

Building Reliable Rating Curves: 5 Best Practices - Stuart Hamilton, NASH, Vancouver, BC, Canada (co-author: M. Watson)
Progress in Uncertainty Calculation of Discharges through Hydraulic Structures in South Florida Measured by ADCPs and Estimated By Rating Algorithms - Juan A. Gonzalez-Castro , South Flordia Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL
Dealing with Loops in Rating Curves - Robert Holmes, U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO
Daily Flow Estimation in Ungaged Basins - USGS progress and perspectives - Julie Kiang, US Geological Survey, Reston, VA (co-authors: S.Archfield, L. Hay)

Moderator - James Porter
NYC Department of Environmental Protection, Grahamsville, NY

Ensemble Streamflow Forecasts and Water Supply Reservoir Operations: New York City's Operations Support Tool (OST) - James Porter, NYC Department of Environmental Protection, Grahamsville, NY (co-author: A. H. Matonse)
Ensemble Forecasting in Support of Dynamic Reservoir Operations - Gerald Day, Riverside, Fort Collins, CO (co-authors: J. Schaake, M. Thiemann, S. Draijer, G. Miller)
Hydrologic Forecasts for Dynamic Reservoir Operations Under Climate Change - Ben Wright, Hazen and Sawyer, Baltimore, MD (co-authors: M. Rivera, G.Day, B. Stanford)

Reservoir Reallocation in the Southeast, U.S.: Hedging Risks for a Dynamic Climate - Lauren Patterson, Nicholas Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC (co-author: M. W. Doyle)

Moderator - Mary Snieckus
State & Private Forestry - Cooperative Forestry Program, USFS, Washington, DC

Integrating Ecosystem Services into USDA Forest Service Programs and Projects: Perspectives from across the Agency. The Other Side of Watershed Restoration on National Forests and Grasslands - Socioeconomics - Jonas Epstein (USFS) presenting for Rob Harper, USDA Forest Service, Washington, DC (co-author: L. Berger)
Integrating Ecosystem Services into USDA Forest Service Programs and Projects: Perspectives from across the Agency. A National Effort to Institutionalize the Ecosystem Services Approach - Emily Weidner, USDA Forest Service, Washington, DC
Ecosystem Valuation for Alternate Development Approaches in India: USFS and WWF-India - Nikola Smith, U.S. Forest Service, PNW Region, Portland, OR
A Research Agenda for Evaluating Water and Associated Ecosystem Services - Greg Arthuad, USDA Forest Service, Washington, DC (co-authors: G. Arthaud, K. Smith )

Moderator - Tamara Newcomer Johnson
National Sea Grant Office, Silver Spring, MD

Source Water Protection Challenges in the Alafia River Watershed - Doug Robison, Environmental Science Associates, Tampa, FL (co-author: R. McConnell)
Alafia River Tiered Source Water Monitoring Program - Robert McConnell, Tampa Bay Water, Clearwater, FL (co-author: D. Robison)
A Penny saved is a Penny Earned? A Protection Strategy for Drinking Water Sources is like Money in the Bank - Sandra Warner, CHA Consulting, Inc, Blacksburg, VA
Protecting the Potomac River as a Source of Drinking Water for Metropolitan Washington, D.C., and Upstream Communities - Karin Bencala, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Rockville, MD

Moderator - Faye Sleeper
University of Minnesota Water Resources Center, St. Paul, MN

Four Approaches to Training of Water Resource Professionals. - Faye Sleeper, University of Minnesota Water Resources Center, St. Paul, MN (co-authors: J. Bonnell, J. Frankenburger, A. Lewandowski, L. Wolfson)
Core Competencies for Watershed Managers - Joseph Bonnell, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Professional Training Methods: The Role of Online Learning - Ann Lewandowski, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (co-authors: J. Frankenberger, L. Wolfson, J. Bonnell)

 

Tuesday / November 4 / 10:30 AM - 12:00 Noon
Concurrent Sessions 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24

Moderator - Cindy Dyballa
Sligo Creek Resources, Takoma Park, MD

Panelists:

Cindy Dyballa, Sligo Creek Resources, Takoma Park, MD
Overview of Historic Water Use and Issues for the Future,

Ed Osann, Natural Resources Defense Council, Washington, DC
State and National Policies-California Issues

Paul Lander, Dakota Ridge Partners, Boulder, CO
Efficient Water Use and Land Use Patterns

Denise Fort, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Role of Efficiency in Western Water Resources

Steve Nadel, American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, Washington, DC
Transferring Energy Efficiency Approaches to Water


The field of water efficiency has made significant strides in the last 25 years, since one of the first national water efficiency conferences--Conserv90. Think of the changes: from a few communities adopting local showerhead ordinances to nationwide plumbing standards and over half of U.S. states with water conservation planning requirements; from bricks in the toilet to ultra low flow fixtures; from motivating customers with "shower with a friend" to customized online water use calculators. Where water and energy efficiency were once treated as separate programs with different rationales, recent research on the energy-water nexus has prompted more joint programs and a national conversation about their relationship. Once, utilities questioned whether water efficiency programs help or hinder in time of drought. Now, water efficiency is looked to as one prime tool in climate change adaptation. Water efficiency is much less seen as something just for western U.S. cities. Today some of the most innovative practices are being undertaken by east coast communities. The role of more efficient water use in the health of a watershed is also an emerging topic, and the environmental benefits of specific water efficiency practices are being noted. State and federal policy has kept pace with the increasing need for more efficient water use, its role in a watershed, and its relationship to other pressing issues of our day. Yet clearly even greater adoption of more efficient water use policies and programs will be needed in the future, and there are several ways to get there. This presentation will describe the adoption of water efficiency policies and measures then and now, identify trends, and suggest some alternative futures and possible government responses as more efficient water use becomes an imperative throughout the US. Both federal and state policies, as well as local efficiency programs and codes, will be addressed, though the focus for the future will be on national policy. Representatives of leading water utility programs, researchers, and environmental groups will discuss these issues.

Moderator - Stuart Hamilton
NASH, Vancouver, BC, Canada

The Importance of Testing Hydroacoustic Instruments - USGS Case Studies - Kevin Oberg, U.S. Geological Survey, Urbana, IL
Inter-Laboratory Comparison of Calibration Procedures for Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters - Kirk Thibodeaux, U.S. Geological Survey, Stennis Space Center, MS
WMO/IAHR/IAHS International Courses on Stream Gauging - Claudio Caponi, World Meteorological , Geneva, GE, Switzerland (co-authors: V. Sauer, M. Nolan, M.E. Smith, P. Pilon, R. Ranzi, J. Le Coz)

Derivation, Uncertainty, and Variance of the Calibration Factor used in Salt Dilution Flow Measurements - Gabriel Sentlinger, Aquarius R&D Inc., Bowen Island, BC, Canada (co-author: A. Zimmerman)

Moderator - James Porter
NYC Department of Environmental Protection, Grahamsville, NY

Case Studies Using Water Quality Models and Forecasts to Inform Reservoir System Decisions for the New York City Water Supply - Mark Zion, NYC Dept. of Environmental Protection, Kingston, NY (co-authors: D. C. Pierson, A. H. Matonse)
Evaluating the Performance of Multiple Alternative Operating Rules under Climate Change: A Case Study of New York City - Leslie DeCristofaro, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Amherst, MA (co-author: R. Palmer)
New York City's Operations Support Tool: Motivation, Use Cases, and Components - Grantley Pyke, Hazen and Sawyer, Baltimore, MD (co-author: J. H. Porter)
The Methodology and Associated Challenges With Developing Future Projections of Design Rainfall - Dmitry Smirnov, Dewberry Consultants, Denver, CO (co-authors: J. Choi, J.Giovannettone, M. Sreetharan)

Moderator - Adelaide Johnson
University of Alaska Southeast, Juneau, AK

Hydrology and Sustainable Indigenous Populations - Adelaide Johnson, University of Alaska Southeast, Juneau , AK (co-authors: L. E. Kruger , B. Schrader)
Linkages between Thermal Heterogeneity and Juvenile Coho Salmon Phenology and Growth: Implications for the Adaptive Capacity of Salmon to Climate Change - Emily Campbell, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (co-authors: J. B. Dunham, G. H. Reeves, S. M. Wondzell)
Organic and Inorganic Subsidy Pathways from Glacial Melt Water to Coastal Marine Food Webs - Mayumi Arimitsu, U.S. Geological Survey, Juneau, AK (co-authors: J. Piatt, K. Hobson, E. Hood, J. Fellman, F. Mueter, A. Beaudreau)

Moderator - Jesse Richardson
West Virginia University College of Law, Morgantown, WV

Regulatory Takings and Water Rights - Jesse Richardson, WVU College of Law, Morgantown, WV
Calculating Damages for Takings of Groundwater - Tiffany Dowell, Texas A&M Agrilife Extension, College Station, TX
Regulatory Takings and Water Rights - Andrea Wortzel, Troutman Sanders LLP, Richmond, VA
Water Rights and Water as Habitat - Tony Francois, Pacific Legal Foundation, Sacramento, CA

Moderator - Lara Bryant
National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC

Clean Water Grows - Lara Bryant, National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC
Recent Developments in Water Quality Trading - Everything a Water Resource Manager Should Know - Christopher Hartley, USDA Office of Environmental Markets, Washington, DC
Strengthening Water Quality Trading Programs - Sara Walker, World Resources Institute, Washington, DC (co-author: M. Selman)
Achieving Cleaner Water through Targeted Watershed Projects - Michelle Perez, World Resources Institute, Washington, DC (co-authors: S. Walker, M. Selman, K. Reytar)


Tuesday / November 4 / 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

Moderator - Richard Engberg
American Water Resources Association, Middleburg, VA

Panelists:
Debra Knopman, Rand Corporation, Arlington, VA
Joan Rose, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
Gerald E. Galloway, Jr., University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Michael Campana, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

AWRA turned 50 years old in 2014. The January 2014 issue of Water Resources IMPACT celebrated the 50th birthday of AWRA with a series of essays on the future of water resources in the United States. This is the first of three panels featuring authors of these essays. During AWRA's 50 years of existence, water research has led to faster, more efficient ways of addressing water resources problems with the development and use of models of all kinds, of miniaturization of equipment, of real time transmission and availability of data, and of instrumentation that allows the analysis of hitherto undetectable contaminants among many other technical advances. Looking to the future, panel members will discuss these changes and look at research that is needed to meet future challenges. Debra Knopman will focus on the challenge of structuring, conducting and presenting interdisciplinary research on systems that, due to climate change, are characterized by pervasive uncertainties. Joan Rose will detail the need for innovative methods of in situ and remote sensing that bring together pollution science and other disciplines that include our engineered infrastructure. Gerry Galloway will speculate on the water resources future if more attention is not given to the basics, data gathering, monitoring, assessment, flood mapping, infrastructure improvement for surface water, groundwater, emerging contaminants, and coastal erosion. Michael Campana will discuss the need for managing groundwater as a component of an integrated system and for continued research into determining exactly how much groundwater we have, where it is located and if it can be recovered.

Moderator - Stuart Hamilton
NASH, Vancouver, BC, Canada

World Meteorological Organization's Project X - Janice Fulford, U.S. Geological Survey, Stennis Space Center, MS (co-authors: P. Pilon, C. Caponi)
Quantifying the Uncertainty in Discharge Estimates - Timothy Cohn, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA (co-authors: J.Kiang, R. R. Mason, Jr.)
Quantifying and Controlling Uncertainty in Salt Dilution Flow Measurements - Gabriel Sentlinger, Aquarius R&D Inc., Bowen Island, BC, Canada (co-author: A. Zimmerman)

Improving the Quality and Efficiency of ADCP Streamflow Measurements - David Mueller, U.S. Geological Survey, Louisville, KY

Moderator - Joseph Daraio
Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ

Reservoir Operations for Climate Change Adaptation in the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area - Megan Rivera, HydroLogics, Columbia, MD (co-authors: S. Nebiker, C. Schultz, B. Wright, G. Day, D. Sheer, B. Stanford)
The Role of Climate and Water Resources Data in Societal Decisions within the Klamath Basin of Oregon and California - Mark Deutschman, Houston Engineering, Inc., Maple Grove, MN
The MJO Impacts South America Rainfall and the Frequency of Global Hurricane Development - Jason Giovannettone, HydroMet, LLC, Alexandria, VA

Moderator - Richard Pinkham
Booz Allen Hamilton, Greenwood Village, CO

Framing the Policy Space-Partnership and Market-Based Program Models - Richard Pinkham, Booz Allen Hamilton, Greenwood Village, CO
Stormwater Retention Credit Trading and Internalizing the Externalities of Stormwater Runoff in Washington, DC - Brian Van Wye, DDOE - Stormwater Management Division, Washington, DC
Greening Neighborhoods and Reducing Costs by Stimulating Private Landowner Investment in Green Infrastructure - Alisa Valderrama, NRDC, San Francisco, CA
Accelerating Green Stormwater Infrastructure Implementation in Philadelphia - Paula Conolly, Trans-Pacific Engineering, Philadelphia, PA

Moderator - Jessica Newlin
Bucknell University, Lewisberg, PA

Groundwater Availability in the Appalachian Plateaus - Kurt McCoy, USGS, Richmond, VA (co-authors: R. M. Yager, D. L. Nelms, D. E. Ladd)
Quarry Conversion: Critical Planning and Design Elements - Pamela Kenel, Black & Veatch, Gaithersburg, MD (co-authors: C.Hirner, F. Oksuz, .O. Farooqi)
Selection Analysis using GIS for City of Baltimore Water Program - Michael McCarn, EBA Engineering, Laurel, MD (co-authors: D. Thompson, G.A. Moore, Sr.)
The Rich History of Baltimore City's Stormwater Programs: Where We Have Been and Where We Need to Go - William Stack, Center for Watershed Protection, Ellicott City, MD

Moderator - Sharon Megdal
University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center, Tucson, AZ

An Overview of the Water Resources Research Act and the National Institutes of Water Resources - Sharon Megdal, University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center, Tucson, AZ
Fifty Years of the WRRA and the USGS State Water Resources Research Institute's Program - Earl Greene, U.S. Geological Survey, Baltimore, MD
The Role of the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute in Supporting Management of the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer - John Tracy, University of Idaho, Boise, ID
Evaluating Total N-Nitrosamine Precursor Sources in Watersheds and Drinking Water Systems - Julian Fairey, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (co-authors: D. A. Meints II, W. Zhang)


Tuesday / November 4 / 3:30 PM -5:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36

Moderator - Richard Engberg
American Water Resources Association, Middleburg, VA

Panelists
Denise Fort, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Brenda Bateman, Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, O
G. Tracy Mehan III, The Cadmus Group, Arlington, VA
Ari Michelsen, Texas A&M, El Paso, TX

AWRA turned 50 years old in 2014. The January 2014 issue of Water Resources IMPACT celebrated the 50th birthday of AWRA with a series of essays on the future of water resources in the United States. This is the second of three panels featuring authors of these essays. During AWRA's 50 years of existence, water policy in the United States at all levels has undergone profound changes owing to a great extent to the emergence of the ecological and environmental awareness and the passage of federal laws promulgating clean and safe water. Panel members will discuss these changes from legal, economic, and policy points of view and will look to the future to try to predict what the future of water policy in the United States in a time of increasing population, changing demographics, changing hydrologic conditions and, above all, climate change. Fort and Bateman will focus on the need for potential law and policy changes while Mehan and Michelsen will discuss the economics of water and whether the current system of water pricing will need to be changed to meet future needs and what changes might be needed.

Moderator - Janice Fulford
U.S. Geological Survey, Stennis Space Center, MS

Panelists:
Frank Weber, Hydrometeorologic Field Programs Scientist, BC Hydro
Juan Gonzalez, Streamgauging Section Lead, South FL Water Management Dist., West Palm Beach, FL
Kevin Oberg, Hydrologist, Office of Surface Water, U.S. Geological Survey, Urbana, IL
Brian Wahlin, Senior Hydraulic Engineer, WEST Consultants, Tempe, AZ

(NASH) Discharge measurements of water are used by water managers, land use planners, engineers and hydrologists to make decisions concerning water allocations, flood risks, zoning, flood structures, and bridges. The quality and uncertainty of discharge measurements affect the level of confidence in the decisions made on the basis of those discharge measurements. The panel will discuss whether alternative methods for estimating the uncertainty of discharge measurements could yield more robust estimates than those afforded by current approaches.

Moderator - Seth Brown
Water Environment Federation, Alexandria, VA

Climate Impact Studies - Estimating Population Projection Using ICLUS to Reflect Selected Representative Concentration Pathways - Sivasankkar Selvanathan, Dewberry, Fairfax, VA (co-author: M. Sreetharan)
Modeling Streamflow and Water Quality Sensitivity to Climate Change and Urban Development in 20 U.S. Watersheds - Thomas Johnson, USEPA, Washington , DC (co-authors: J. Butcher, D. Deb, M. Faizullabhoy, D. Nover, S. Sarkar, R. Srinivasan, P. Tuppad, C. Weaver, J. Witt)
Use of Watershed Scale-Modelling to Assess the Impact of Climate Change and Land Use Variation on Microbial Loading - Rory Coffey, School of Biosystems Engineering, University College Dublin, Dublin, Lei, Ireland (co-authors: B. Benham, M. L. Wolfe, K. Kline, E. Cummins)

Moderator - Sandra Warner
CHA Consulting, Inc., Blacksburg, VA

Wetlands and Hurricanes: A Geospatial Perspective on the Potential of Wetlands to Reduce Storm Surge Impact to Critical Infrastructure - Jana Haddad, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (co-author: C. M. Ferreira)
The Correlation Between Hurricane Sandy Storm Surge Damage And Historical Coastal Marshes: The Legacy of Short-Sighted Development - Josh Galster, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ
Integrated Natural Restoration and Structural Flood Protection to Improve Flood Resiliency for Oakwood Beach Community in Staten Island, New York After Hurricane Sandy - Rahul Parab, Dewberry, New York , NY (co-authors: M. Shultz, T. Graupensperger, S. McCormick)

Moderator - Karen Bushaw-Newton
Northern Virginia Community College, Annandale, VA

Incorporating and Assessing Newly Implemented Common Core Objectives Through the Evaluation of a School-Centered, Community-Based Research (CBEMR) Project Focused on Student Managed Groundwater Protection - Teresa Thornton, Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches, Jupiter, FL (co-author: J. Peckenham)
AquArts: Linking Art and Science in Water Use Education for Elementary Schoolers - Jeffrey Kast, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (co-authors: N. Nelson, R. Williams, R. Zantout, G. Klarenberg, S. Capon)
City of Wilmington, Delaware's Green Jobs Program - Martha Narvaez, University of Delaware, Newark, DE
'Heard it through the Grapevine' - Are Students Informally Informed? - E. Annette Hernandez, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TS (co-authors : V.Uddameri)
Faculty as Google - Changing Student Perceptions of Faculty in the 21st Century and the Role of Technology - Venki Uddameri, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (co-authors: E. A. Hernandez)

Moderator - John Tracy
University of Idaho, Boise, ID

The California Institute for Water Resources: 50+ Years of Science and Outreach - Doug Parker, California Institute for Water Resources, Oakland, CA
Iowa's Water Resources Research Institute: 50 Years and Beyond - Melissa Miller, Iowa Water Center, Ames, IA (co-author: R. M. Cruse)
Fifty Years of Water Research, Education, and Outreach at the Virginia Water Resources Research Center - Stephen Schoenholtz, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg, VA (co-authors: L. Juran, K. McGuire, A. Raflo, J. Walker)
Stakeholder Engagement Practices of the Arizona Water Resources Research Center - Sharon Megdal, University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center, Tucson, AZ


Wednesday / November 5 / 8:30 AM -10:00 AM
Concurrent Sessions 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42

Moderator - Richard Engberg
American Water Resources Association, Middleburg, VA

Panelists:
Donald Wilhite, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
Don Riley, Dawson and Associates, Washington, DC
Theresa Connor, Water Environment Research Foundation, Alexandria, VA
Eric Fitch, Marietta College, Marietta, OH

AWRA turned 50 years old in 2014. The January 2014 issue of Water Resources IMPACT celebrated the 50th birthday of AWRA with a series of essays on the future of water resources in the United States. This is the third of three panels featuring authors of these essays. During AWRA's 50 years of existence, like water policy, water management in the United States at all levels has undergone profound changes. Drought has continued to plague various areas of the United State sometimes for prolonged periods. Flood management has improved significantly but monetary losses have continued to increase. Advances in irrigation technologies have led to a leveling of water use but agricultural chemicals continue to contaminate the nation's waters. Population in coastal zones continues to increase at the same time as coastal erosion continues. Wilhite will discuss the need for drought mitigation measures and need for effective drought management policies. Riley will focus on flood risk reduction measures and need for increased public awareness. Conner will provide insight agricultural conservation practices and the ease of use and cost effectiveness of these practices. Fitch will relate such things as ocean acidification and the impacts on freshwater resources in coastal areas from sea level rise to increasing coastal zone populations.

Moderator - Stephanie Kroll
Academy of Natural Sciences at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA

Panelists:
Peter Clagget, U.S. Geological Survey, Annapolis, MD
Claire Jantz, Shippensburg University, Shippensburg, PA
Paul Faeth, CNA Corporation, Arlington, VA
Matt Earhart, Stroud Water Research Center, Avondale, PA

Two panels will present complementary discussions of ecological modeling as applied to the projected outcomes of watershed protection and restoration strategies. This session will focus on large scale changes at the basin and sub-basin level as various protection/restoration strategies are applied. Among methods that will be discussed, the urban growth model SLEUTH (Slope, Land cover, Exclusion, Urbanization, Transportation, and Hillshade) has been used to assess projected water quality and availability impacts from climate change, population growth and/or specific development scenarios at basin and regional scales. The panel will also highlight development of the basin-scale application of the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model, particularly to better understand potential impacts on landcover/water quality from such changes as potentially lifting the Marcellus shale development moratorium and/or from complete (re)forestation of riparian buffer zones. In addition, the discussion will include use of "Model My Watershed", a WIKI watershed product, to model large scale scenarios and to bridge the gap from basin scale to site scale. The discussion will include the ways in which models can be used together synergistically, and as a management tools for basin-scale policy decisions. There will be specific discussion of modeling the value of green infrastructure on catchments using a suite of watershed restoration practices.

Moderator - Michael Campana
Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

South Caucasus Saga: Water, Energy, and Security in the Kura-Araks Basin of Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia - Michael Campana, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
Scales of Human Security Stability in Dam Development: Nile and Mekong Rivers - Jennifer Veilleux, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
The Forgotten Threat: The Environmental Consequences of Industrial Cyber Attacks - Jan Kallberg and Rosemary Burk , The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX
Shared groundwater resources by Mexico and USA in Paso del Norte Region - Zhuping Sheng, Texas A&M AgriLife Research , El Paso, TX (co-authors: A. Michelsen, Y. Liu)

Moderator -

Quantification of Efficiencies related to Tailwater Recovery Systems - Joby Prince Czarnecki, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS (co-authors: A. R. Omer, R. Kroger)
Assessing BMPs: Efficacy of Tailwater Recover Systems and On-farm Storage Reservoirs as an Approach to Water Resource Conservation - Austin Omer, Mississippi State University, Starkville , MS (co-authors: J. M. Prince Czarnecki, R. Kroger)
Responding to the Manure Challenge: An Agency View - Noel Gollehon, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Beltsville, MD
An Evaluation of Irrigation Diversion Effects on Sediment Transport and Channel Morphology in the Upper Snake River, Idaho - Tim Hanrahan, GeoEngineers, Richland, WA (co-authors: M.Troost, T. Maguire, D. Risso)

Moderator - Venki Uddameri
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX

Assessing the Impacts of River Regulation on the Sustainability of Groundwater in the Western US - John Tracy, University of Idaho, Boise, ID (co-author: J. Johnson)
Montana Baseline Groundwater Monitoring of Wells and Aquifers at Risk from Oil Field Activities - Alice Stanley, Montana Dept. of Natural Resources and Conservation, Helena, MT
Monitoring of Groundwater Quantity and Quality Using GRACE Satellite Data in Louisiana, USA - Mohamed Saber, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA (co-authors: E. Habib, D. Borrok)
Monitoring of Groundwater Fluctuations and Trend in Parts of Northern Punjab (vern. Majha), India - Gopal Krishan, National Institute of Hydrology, Ministry of Water Resources, Roorkee, Utt, India (co-authors: P. Garg, K.S. Takshi, A.K. Lohani, M.S. Rao, R.S. Loyal, C.P. Kumar, N.K. Tuli, M. Singh, P. Semwal)
When are Variable Density Effects Significant to Consider? - a Field Scale Example - Gregory Nelson, Geomega, Boulder, CO (co-author: W. Barrash)

Moderator - Allyson Beall King
School of the Environment, Washington State University, Pullman, WA

Development and Evaluation of Nationwide and Regional Bankfull Hydraulic Geometry Relationships for the United States for Use in Hydrological Models - Katrin Bieger, Texas A&M AgriLife, Blackland Research and Extension Center, Temple, TX (co-authors: H.Rathjens, P.M. Allen, J.G. Arnold)
An Effective Parameter Screening Strategy for High Dimensional Watershed Models - Yogesh Khare, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (co-authors: C. Martinez, R. Munoz-Carpena)
Modeling Water Quality and BMP Performance in the Arroyo Colorado Watershed, Texas - Yamen Hoque, Texas A&M AgriLife Blackland Research & Extension Center, Temple, TX (co-authors: J. Jeong, J. M. Osorio Leyton)
Integration of Green and Grey Infrastructure to Mitigate Storm Sewer Capacity Deficiencies and Provide Climate Resilience in Alexandria, Virginia - Brian Rahal, City of Alexandria, T&ES, Alexandria, VA (co-authors: C.Salas, L. van der Tak, H. Manguera, J. Calmbacher)
High-Fidelity Water Quality Surrogate Model Validation for a Hydropower Reservoir - Amelia Shaw, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (co-authors: H. Smith Sawyer, E. LeBoeuf, M. McDonald )

Wednesday / November 5 / 10:30 AM -12:00 Noon
Concurrent Sessions 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48

Moderator - Jerry Rogers
Retired Consulting Engineer, Houston, TX

Panelists:
Jerry Rogers, Retired Consulting Engineer, Houston, TX
Richard A. Engberg, American Water Resources Association, Middleburg, VA
David R. DeWalle, Penn State University, University Park, PA

This session covers the history of the American Water Resources Association (1964-2014), starting with the AWRA publication: THE AWRA STORY: On the Occasion of Its 25th Anniversary, Mary Marsh, September 1989, 62 pp. Rogers will cover the early years of AWRA and the first annual conference of AWRA December 1-3, 1965 at the University of Chicago. Engberg will summarize the AWRA history from 1965-2004, utilizing the Marsh 1989 publication and a paper by J. Paul Riley and Jerry Rogers: "The American Water Resources Association: Past, Present and Future," Water Resources and Environmental History, Rogers-Brown- Garbrecht (Editors), ASCE, 2004, 285 pp. DeWalle will cover highlights of AWRA over the past ten years from a recent AWRA paper: DeWalle- Rogers: "The American Water Resources Association 1964-2014: Fifty-Years Dedicated to Water Resources Management, Research and Education."

Moderator - Nathan Boon
William Penn Foundation, Philadelphia, PA

Panelists:
Barry Evans, Penn State University, University Park, PA
Jeffrey Featherstone, Temple University, Ambler, PA
Andrea Welker, Villanova University, Villanova, PA
Stefanie Kroll, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA


This session will look at modeling as a tool for understanding strategies and best management practices as they impact conditions at the subwatershed, reach, or project-level scale. Applications to be discussed will include: The MapShed model, as it has been used to begin assessing water quality and availability impacts from specific land protection projects; USACE models to assess impacts on complete catchments from a suite of watershed restoration practices; and SWMM (Stormwater Management Model) to assess site-specific impacts on hydrology and water quality from individual green stormwater control measures. Presentations will include discussion on sampling and data acquisition, and the use of data for model calibration and validation. Additional topics may include the use of modeling as an educational or public engagement tool.

Moderator - Edwin Brands
University of Minnesota-Morris, Morris, MN

International Levee Handbook and Levee Community of Practice - Jonathan Simm, HR Wallingford, Wallingford, OX, UK (co-authors: D. Powers, W. Empson)
Provision of Water after Major Disasters - Lessons Learned - Trevor Cone, Dewberry, Fairfax, VA
Residential Water Demand in Al-Ain, UAE - Mohamed Gheblawi, UAE University, Al-Ain, AD, United Arab Emirates
Influence of US Water Resources Policies on Policy Forming in Japan - Junichi Yoshitani, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto, Japan

Moderator - Emily McCoy
Andropogon Associates, Philadelphia, PA

The District of Columbia's Consolidated TMDL Implementation Plan: Building a Modeling Tool to Develop and Inform the Implementation Plan for Addressing Multiple MS4 WLAs - Anouk Savineau, LimnoTech, Washington, DC (co-author: J.Champion)
Implementing Complex TMDLs for PCBs in the Delaware River Estuary - Thomas J Fikslin, Delaware River Basin Commission, West Trenton, NJ (co-authors: N. S. Suk, G. J. Cavallo)
Implementing Chesapeake Bay TMDL Requirements for a Statewide Linear MS4- Step 1 - Ashley Hall, EEE Consulting, Mechanicsville, VA (co-authors: C. Swanson, D. Beisch, A.Foraste)

Best Management Practice Bonuses: Public Health Benefits of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL - Jennifer Richkus, RTI International, Washington, DC (co-authors: L. A. Wainger, M. Barber)

Moderator - Tim Hanrahan
GeoEngineers, Richland, WA

Combined Geophysical Methods for Mapping Infiltration Pathways at an Aquifer Recharge and Recovery Site - Cameron Jasper, Colorado School of Mines, Golden , CO (co-authors: A. Revil, M. Deqiang, P. Kessouri, J. Selker)
Temporal and Spatial Water Management Using ASR - Bruce Lytle, Lytle Water Solutions, LLC, Highlands Ranch, CO
Status on Updated ASCEEWRI Guidelines on Managed Aquifer Recharge - Gordon McCurry, Geomega Inc, Boulder, CO (co-authors: P. Barkman, D. Bartlett, Z.Sheng, P. Stanin, D. McGrane )
Relationship Between Eco-Hydrological Process and Biogeochemical Cycle in Inland Waters - Tadanobu Nakayama, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Iba, Japan (co-author: S. Maksyutov)
Modeling and Performance Prediction of Chromate Reduction by Iron Oxide Coated Sand in Adsorber Reactors - Ryan Thacher, Exponent, Seattle, WA (co-authors: M. Pirbazari, V. Ravindran)

Moderator - Paul Lander
University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, CO

Rio Grande Compact Decision Support Tool: Using Probabilistic Flow Forecasts for Interstate Compact Administration - Amy Volckens, Riverside Technology, Inc, Fort Collins, CO (co-authors: C. Cotton, J. Busto, J. Day, L. Wade, I. Maycumber)
To Green or Not to Green: Modeling an Incentive-based Program for Green Infrastructure Investment - Seth Brown, Water Environment Federation, Alexandria, VA (co-authors: M.Houck, C.Ferreira)
Risk Management as an Effective Tool for Project/Program Success beyond Traditional Valuation Categories of Cost, Time, and Quality - Joshua Joseph, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA (co-author: D. Guillory)
Emerging USGS Water-Resources Monitoring and Analysis Tools for Watershed Management - Kenneth Hyer, U.S. Geological Survey, Richmond, VA (co-authors: M. Bennett, J. Jastram, D. Moyer)
Application of Multicriteria Decision Making Techniques in Drinking Water Management - Emmanuel Asapo, Lagos State University, Epe Campus, Lagos, Nigeria (co-author: A. F. Adesanya)

Wednesday / November 5 / 1:30 PM -3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54

Moderator - Doug James
Retired, Fairfax, VA

Panelists:

Peter Rogers, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Yacov Haimes, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
Pete Loucks, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
Jerad Bales. USGS, Reston, VA
George Pinder, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT
John Schaake, Consulting Hydrologist, Annapolis, MD
Lenny Konikow, Consulting Geohydrologist, Reston VA


By 1974, AWRA had become an intellectual home for academics and practioners challenged by needs for raising water resources management to a higher level. Many excellent ideas were presented at AWRA's tenth anniversary conference, and some of those authors are still working toward that goal. These along with others senior leaders in water resources published their current assessments in the May 2014 issue of Impact. This session would split between author presentations of highlights and discussion with the audience on moving forward.

Moderator - Daniel McCool
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

Floodplain Modeling & Mapping with HEC-RAS - Joseph Kirby, ESP Associates, Raleigh, NC
Frequency of Extreme Streamflow Events in the Mid-Atlantic - Gina Tonn, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (co-author: S. Guikema)
Hydroclimatic and Geomorphic Influences on the Spatial Scaling of Floods - Carolyn Plank, University of Maryland College Park, Washington, DC (co-author: K.Prestegaard)
The C-4 Basin Initiative: A Creative Response to Flood Protection - Jesse VanEyk, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

Moderator - Elizabeth Krousel
Michael Baker International, Alexandria, VA

Water Quality Modeling for Evaluation of Potential Surface Water and Groundwater Impacts: Aurora Gold Project, Guyana - Felix Kristanovich, ENVIRON, Seattle, WA (co-authors: G. Mills, F. Achour)
Effects of Climate Change on Irrigation Demand from Rice Fields in the Dry Zone of Sri Lanka - Thushara Gunda, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (co-author: G. M. Hornberger)
Killer Cold Waves in Nepal: Possible Causes In Nepalgunj - Santosh Raj Neupane, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (co-author: C. M. Ferreira)

Moderator - Zhulu Lin
North Dakota State University, Fargo, NC

Evaluating Sources and Quantifying Differences in Soil e. Coli Occurrence in Minimally Impacted Catchments - Lucas Gregory, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX (co-authors: T.Gentry, E. Martin, P. Wanjugi, D. Harmel, K. Wagner)
Coastal Watershed Planning - Modeling Bacterial Loads in a Rural Watershed for BMP Implementation - Stephanie Glenn, Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX (co-author: B. Neish)
Using the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting Model to Provide Short-Term Forecasts of Surface Runoff For Daily Decision Making in Nutrient Management - Anthony Buda, USDA-ARS, University Park, PA (co-authors: S. M. Reed, C. J. Lamba, G. J. Folmar, P.J.A. Kleinman, R. B. Bryant, P. G. Knight, D. Miller, B. Bills, P. Ahnert, P. Drohan)
Assessing Watershed Scale Responses to BMP Implementation in Urban Watersheds - John Jastram, U.S. Geological Survey, Richmond, VA

Moderator - Joshua Joseph
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA

Improving Water Efficiency in the Delaware River Basin through Water System Audits - David Sayers, Delaware River Basin Commission, West Trenton, NJ (co-author: K. F. Najjar)
Attacking Water Loss: Georgia's New Water Mindset - Steve Cavanaugh, Cavanaugh & Associates, Asheville, NC (co-authors: W. Jernigan, L. Moeti, J. Bodwell)
Drought Characterization in Groundwater Dependent Southern High Plains Region of Texas - Venki Uddameri, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (co-authors: J.Ruiz-De-Vinaspre, E. A.Hernandez)
Riverside's Custom Water Supply Index for Denver Water - Providing Timely Information - Amy Volckens, Riverside Technology, Inc, Fort Collins, CO (co-authors: N. Elder, J. Day, L. Wade)

Moderator - Chi Ho Sham
The Cadmus Group, Inc., Waltham, MA

Reshaping Water Supply to Support River Restoration: a Decision-Making Framework for Water Supply Investments - William Swanson, MWH Americas, Sacramento, CA (co-author: K. Matsuim I. Khadam, M. Manzo)
Conducting Water Sector Consequence Analysis and Risk Assessments for Security Threats and Natural Hazards - J. Elise Tao (CSC, Alexandria, VA) presenting for Dan Schmelling, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (co-author: J. DeGour)
Alteration of Surface Energy Balance in South Florida Driven by Land Use Land Cover Change - Hari Kandel, Florida International University, Miami, FL (co-author: A. Melesse)
Use of SEAWAT for Predicting Saltwater Upconing in Water Supply Wells on Cape Cod, Massachusetts - Maura Metheny, Geomega, Inc., Boulder, CO (co-author: C. F. McLane III)


Wednesday / November 5 / 3:30 PM -5:00 PM

Concurrent Sessions 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60

Moderator - Carol Collier
Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA

Panelists:

Steven Tambini
Delaware River Basin Commission, West Trenton, NJ
Fifty Years and Counting: Unified Water Management in the Delaware River Basin

Andrew Dehoff
Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Harrisburg, PA
The Past is Prologue: Emerging Water Management Challenges in the Susquehanna River Basin

Carlton Haywood
ICPRB, Rockville, MD
Collaborative River Basin Management for the Nation's River

Starting in 1961, state/federal compact river basin commissions have been authorized by state and federal legislation to manage water resources on a watershed basis. Over the past 50 years this novel approach to planning and regulation of water resources has endured and evolved, yet remains unique in its long term focus to manage water resources.

Three river basin commissions were created under state/federal compacts with mandates to manage water resources without regard to political boundaries:

  • Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC), established in 1961
  • Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC), established in 1970
  • Interstate Commission for the Potomac River Basin (ICPRB), established in 1940

Two of these three organizations - DRBC and SRBC - are unique among river basin management entities in that they have regulatory as well as planning and monitoring responsibilities. Among other topics, the speakers will consider: (a) the Commissions' greatest contributions to water resource management, be they in water quality, flow management, allocation, point or non-point source pollution control or other areas, and where these unique organizations will make the greatest difference in their respective basins over the next 50 years; (b) how relationships between the commissions and their member state and federal agencies have evolved over time; and (c) how the commissions' respective revenue models have evolved and may change.

Moderator - Rahul Parab
Dewberry, New York, NY

Storm Hardening for Critical Infrastructure - Dennis Hogan , Black and Veatch, Philadelphia, PA
Flood Management by Municipalities in Small Towns of the Susquehanna River Valley, Pennsylvania: Local Variations and Influence of State and Federal Programs - Michele Weitzel, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL (co-author: L. D. Duke
Practical Application of Urban Inundation Prediction and Evacuation Support Package System - Go Ozawa, CTI engineering, Fukuoka-city, Japan (co-authors: N.Fujiwara, K.Araki, S.Moriyama, T.yagami, G.Ozawa, K.Nakamura, K.Tabata, Y.Yonese, N.Okamine)

Moderator - Zhuping Sheng
Texas A&M AgriLife Research, El Paso, TX

Worldwide Mega City Growth, Water Resources Issues and Alternative Solutions - Ari Michelsen, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, El Paso, TX (co-authors: Z. Sheng, G. Sun)
Estimation of Future Freshwater Lens Thickness of Micronesian Atoll Islands using Simulated Climate Data - Corey Wallace, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (co-author: R. T. Bailey)
Multipurpose Use of Thermomineral Water Based on the Example of Rajcinovica Banja Spa (Western Serbia, Europe) - Nenad Doroslovac, University of Belgrade, Belgarde, Serbia (co-authors: D. Milenic, N. Savic, M. Jovanovic )
Constructed Wetland Wastewater Treatment and Effluent Reuse as Source of Additional Raw Water: the Experience of the University of Lagos, Nigeria - Adelere Ezekiel Adeniran, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria

Moderator - Leila Hassan- Esfahani
Utah Water Research Laboratory, Logan, UT

Variation in Dissolved Oxygen and Total Nitrogen among Waterbodies - L. Donald Duke, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL (co-authors: J. W. Talbott, E.M. Everham III)
The Implication of the Stein Paradox on Nutrient Criteria Compliance Assessment - Song Qian, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH
Using Native Algae Coelastrum (Col.) 108-5 to Manage Industrial Effluents and Filter Wastewater - Josemaria Silvestrini, Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches, Boynton Beach, FL (co-author: T. E. Thornton)
Nitrogen Removal Through Retrofitting of Urban Stormwater Ponds: A Hydro-Ecological Examination - Luc Claessens, University of Delaware, Newark, DE

Moderator - Augustina Odame
Utah State University, Logan, UT

The PWD's Road to Energy Independence - Teresa DiGenova, Black and Veatch, Philadelphia, PA (co-author: A. Byrne)
Baseline Monitoring in the Delaware River Basin before Natural Gas Development - Thomas J Fikslin, Delaware River Basin Commission, West Trenton, NJ (co-authors: J. Yagecic, E. Silldorff, R. MacGillivray, R. Limbeck)
Development of Energy-Water Nexus Model for Assessment of Water Demand and Supply for Oil Sands Sector - Anum Dar, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada (co-author: A. Kumar)
Comparative Assessment for Water Demand for Coal and Natural Gas Abased Power Generation Pathways - Babkir Ali, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada (co-authors: A. Kumar)

Moderator - Phillip Heilman
USDA-ARS Southwest Watershed Research Center, Tucson, AZ

Water Supply Planning Under Uncertainty - Modeling and Managing the Mystery - Edwin Paulson, MWH Americas, Inc., Denver, CO (co-author: E. Triana)
Collaborative Modeling in the Spokane River Basin: Engaging Stakeholders to Explore Basin-wide Water Management Strategies - Melanie Thornton, School of the Environment, Washington State University, Pullman, WA (co-author: A. Beall King)
Chasing Sustainable Sanitation in Developed Nations: Centralized Sanitation versus Source Separation and Decentralization - Edwin Brands, University of Minnesota Morris, Morris, MN
The StreamStats Web Application of the U.S. Geological Survey, Version 3 - Kernell Ries, U.S. Geological Survey, Catonsville, MD (co-authors: J.D. Guthrie, J. K. Newson, P. A. Steeves, D. W. Stewart)

Thursday / November 6 / 8:30 AM -10:00 AM
Concurrent Sessions 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66

Moderator - David Maidment
University of Texas, Austin, TX

Panelists:

Jerad Bales
, US Geological Survey, Reston, VA
Donald Cline, National Weather Service, Silver Spring, MD
James Dalton, US Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, DC
Joseph Nimmich, FEMA, Washington, DC

What are the large water problems of the nation? What assembly of information is needed to address those problems? How does the present fragmented nature of our water information and institutions limit the solution to these problems? How can these limitations be overcome by a network of shared services for water data, modeling, forecasting and mapping? How can information be shared across levels of government from federal to local and in both directions, so that local actions are informed by national information and equally that especially during water emergencies national response can be informed by local information rapidly communicated and synthesized? How can government water information be presented as services so that commercial firms can transform that into useful applications for particular problems and sets of customers? How can structures such as the Federal Geographic Data Committee and the Advisory Committee on Water Information be used to define an appropriate architecture for Open Water Data sharing for the nation? This session will address these questions to a panel of experts drawn from the national water leadership of the United States.

Moderator - Wayne Wright
GeoEngineers, Inc., Seattle, WA

Yung-Hsin Sun, MWH Americas, Inc., Sacramento, CA
Stephen J. Burges, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Mark A. Gutshall, Landstudies, Inc., Lititz, PA
L. Donald Duke, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL

AWRA's Policy Committee comprises water professionals and others with an interest in how public policy shapes our collective management of water resources. It is a diverse committee that includes scientists, educators, policy-makers, and other experts at all stages of their careers. For the 2013 AWRA Annual Meeting, the Policy Committee researched and analyzed several case studies involving flood and drought management, with a goal of identifying cases where states or municipalities implemented especially proactive actions: planning, policies, or facilities that looked ahead to future problems, and addressed multiple problems - and potential opportunities - rather than single-issue solutions that could engender negative unintended consequences in other ways. As an extension to the 2013 report, the Policy Committee endeavored to assess another set of case studies, this time in the historical context of flood and drought management planning, policies, and actions developed and implemented by agencies and case-study municipalities in the United States. The historical perspective, case study examples, and lessons learned are blended with the current political conditions related to climate change and growing conflicts over water resources in the United States. Recognizing that many of the decisions about managing extreme conditions of flood and drought are made, and actions implemented, by local-level and municipal agencies, the report evaluates in detail eight case studies of local management and response to problems of extreme conditions - four to flooding, and four to drought. Each case study highlights the enabling environment, institutional roles, and management instruments that pertain to each case study, in a way that identifies factors that contribute to or inhibit a proactive and successful flood or drought management plan; common trends among these effective actions; and lessons that can be learned from the experiences of these cases. Information in this report (and the 2013 document) can serve as guidance on instruments and methods that might be applicable for localities that will in the future need to create and implement plans to mitigate or respond to conditions of extreme flows. It also provides additional resources that entities dealing with these water resource issues can consult in designing their management strategies. With the completion of the 2014 report, the Policy Committee will prepare a statement on flood and drought for the AWRA Board of Directors to consider adopting, derived in part from findings of the case studies. This panel presentation will describe the methods used to prepare the 2014 report, summarize the findings, and present lessons learned. An interactive discussion of innovative approaches to flood and drought preparedness will follow the panelists portion t sharing insights and recommendations that emerged from the analyses over the two sets of cases. The session will include an open discussion to invite commentary on how the findings, and other issues, might be incorporated into a policy statement for the AWRA Board of Directors.

Moderator - Amy Volckens
Riverside Technology, Inc., Fort Collins, CO

Real-time Low Flow Forecast Model for Washington Metropolitan Area Water Supply Operations - Cherie Schultz, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Rockville, MD (co-authors: S. Ahmed, M. Thiemann, I. Maycumber)
Profiles in Urban Streams: Bacterial communities of the Anacostia River System - Karen Bushaw-Newton, Northern Virginia Community College, Annandale, VA (co-authors: K. Jensen, J. Kaplan, S.MacAvoy)
Urban Flooding in Washington, DC - An Approach to Modeling Inlet Restrictions with 2-Dimensional Flood Modeling - Steven Skripnik, LimnoTech, Washington, DC (co-authors: W. Levy, J. Cassidy, M. Zelin, V. Janssen, A. Marshall, J. Carl)
Support for Maryland SHA SWM Asset Management and TMDL Program - Rahul Kesarkar, Dewberry Consultants, LLC, Baltimore, MD (co-author: J. Seipp)

Moderator - Felix Kristanovich
ENVIRON, Seattle, WA

Uncovering Algal Ecological Networks Through Dynamic Time Series Analysis - Natalie Nelson, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (co-authors: R. Munoz-Carpena, R. Huffaker, A. Srifa, E. Philips)
Remediation of Bisphenol A Water Contaminants by Reusing Activated Charcoal Filters - May Wang, University of Pennsylvania, Holland, PA (co-author: J.Field)
Development and Implementation of Site-Specific Nutrient Control Solutions in New Jersey - Thomas Amidon, Kleinfelder, Princeton, NJ

Using Dialysis and Gas stripping as Pretreatment for Dissolved Organic Nitrogen Quantification - Bin Hua, Lincoln University of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO (co-authors: Q.Wang, J. Yang, G. Zhu, B. Deng, F. Liu )

Moderator - Gerald Galloway
University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Overview of the Proposed New U.S. Forest Service Policy on Managing Groundwater Resources - Christopher Carlson, USDA Forest Service, Washington, DC (co-authors: T.Thompson, J. Gurrieri)
Overview and Managing Risks of Wildfire for Drinking Water Systems: Results from Two Research Workshops - Chi Ho Sham, The Cadmus Group, Inc., Waltham, MA
Aligning Land Use Planning & Water Management - Paul Lander, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, CO (co-author: M. A. Dickinson)
Texas v. New Mexico Supreme Court Water Case: Process, Issues and Interpretation - Ari Michelsen, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, El Paso, TX (co-authors: T.Dowell, B. Hurd, Z.Sheng, R. D. Lacewell)

Moderator - Steven Trinkaus
Trinkaus Engineering, LLC, Southbury, CT

Overview of Low Impact Development - Steven Trinkaus, Trinkaus Engineering, LLC, Southbury, CT
Environmental Impact Mitigation for the Boise River Watershed, Idaho: Modeling and Alternatives Using LID - Jae Ryu, University of Idaho, Boise, ID
The Application of Low Impact Development Strategies for Land Development Projects - Steven Trinkaus, Trinkaus Engineering, LLC, Southbury, CT
Korea LID-Verification Facility and Research Center: Construction and Development of LID-Verification Instrument - Hyun S. Shin, Pusan National University, Busan, South Korea

 

Thursday / November 6 / 10:30 AM -12:00 Noon
Concurrent Sessions 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72

Moderator - David Blodgett
U.S. Geological Survey, Madison, WI

Development of analyses that summarize hydrologic conditions over long time periods into the past and/or future have significant data requirements. Recent advances in data availability, cloud based data services, computational capacity, and open source analytical tools have created an environment where massive advances in 'Big Data' interpretation and understanding of natural phenomenon can happen even on individual desktop computers. Recent critical advances in data provision, access, processing, and analysis will be presented in this fast paced and engaging session comprised of one lead "vision statement" speaker followed by several brief lightening talks about recent advancements in environmental data sources and systems.

Moderator - Gerald Day
Riverside, Fort Collins, CO

Assessing the Role of Chesapeake Bay Wetlands in Attenuation of Storm Surges Using Coastal Circulation Model and Real-Time Data Collection - Seth Lawler, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (co-authors: M. Deb, C. Ferreira)
Sea Level Rise Integration in Coastal Structures Safe Design - Kaveh Zomorodi, Dewberry, Fairfax, VA
Oakwood Beach Flood Attenuation Feasibility Study - Coastal Analysis - Long Xu, Dewberry, Mount Laurel, NJ (co-authors: M.Shultz, S. McCormick)

Moderator - Betsy Cody
Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC

Critical Area Resource Planning in the Marsh and Rock Creek Watersheds of South-Central Pennsylvania - Heidi Moltz, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Rockville, MD (co-author: J. Palmer)
The Brandywine-Christina Healthy Watershed Fund: Clean Water is Good Business - Gerald Kauffman, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (co-author: R. Jones)
Water Withdrawals in the Delaware River Basin: Past Trends and Future Planning - Kenneth Najjar, Delaware River Basin Commission, West Trenton, NJ (co-authors: J. K. Barr, D. A. Sayers)
Watershed Planning in a Rapidly Developing Suburban Landscape: Upper Broad Run, Loudoun County, Virginia - Nancy Roth, Versar, Inc., Columbia, MD, MD (co-authors: M. Voli, A. Boado, S. Schreiner, A. Brindley, M. Southerland )

Moderator - William Battaglin
U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO

Hormones, Pharmaceuticals, and Other Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Water, Sediment, and Fish Tissue From Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado - William Battaglin, U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (co-authors: P. M. Bradley, L. R. Iwanowicz, E. Furlong, W. Foreman, M. Hladik)
Hormones, Pharmaceuticals and other Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Water and Sediment from Congaree National Park - Paul Bradley, U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia, SC (co-authors: W. A. Battaglin, L. Iwanowicz, W. T. Foreman, E. T. Furlong, F. Henning, T. Hogan, C. A. Journey, D. W. Kolpin, D. Shelley)
A Reconnaissance for Evidence of Reproductive Endocrine Disruption in Smallmouth and Largemouth Bass Inhabiting Northeast U.S. National Wildlife Refuge Waters - Luke Iwanowicz, U.S. Geological Survey, Kearneysville, WV (co-authors: F. Pinkney, A. Sperry, H. Walsh, V.Blazer)
Hormone Activity and Evidence for Reproductive Endocrine Disruption in Fish from National Parks within the Nation Capitol Region - Luke Iwanowicz, U.S. Geological Survey, Kearneysville, WV (co-authors: V. Blazer, A. Landsman, H.Walsh, R. Braham, A. Sperry)
Hormones, Pharmaceuticals and other Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Water and Sediment from the US National Park Service Northern Colorado Plateau Network - Paul Bradley, U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia, SC (co-authors: W.A. Battaglin, L. Iwanowicz, C. Flanagan, W. T. Foreman, E. T. Furlong, K. Keteles, D. W. Kolpin, R. Weissinger)

Moderator - Richard Pinkham
Booz Allen Hamilton, Greenwood Village, CO

The Values Triangle: Balancing Technical Excellence, Accountability, and Fair Processes - Charles Padera, Kleinschmidt Associates, Pittsfield, ME
Integrated Wet Weather Planning - Programmatic and Financial Considerations - Leah Gaffney, Black & Veath, Philadelphia, PA (co-authors: M.Neutz , P. Kumar)
Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint Stakeholders: Working Together to Share a Common Resource - Robert Osborne, Black & Veatch, Greenville, SC (co-authors: B. Moore, S. L. Simpson)
Scientific Facts and Scientists vs. Propagandists: The Fight in Public Fora over Climate Change - Eric Fitch, Marietta College, Marietta, OH

Moderator - Glenn Schaible
Economic Research Service - USDA, Washington, DC

The Benefits of Risk & Resilience Analysis in Water and Sewer Distribution Systems - Michael McCarn, EBA Engineering, Laurel, MD (co-authors: G. A. Moore, Sr., D. Binning)
The Development of Watershed Models and a Decision Support System to Identify Nutrient Sources for Optimization of Agricultural Beneficial Management Practice Implementation - Jason Vanrobaeys, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Morden, MB, Canada (co-author: I. Wong)
Integrated Water Resources Management in Colorado and the American West - William Charles McIntyre, University of Colorado at Denver, Broomfield, CO

Thursday / November 6 / 1:30 PM -3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78

Moderator - Dan Ames
Brigham Young University, Provo, UT

Environmental simulation models that operate at global to local scales for the purpose of both enhancing understanding and supporting management of natural systems continue to improve in terms of utility and accuracy. Such models and modeling tasks are facilitated through the ever growing data stores and data streams, allowing for much improved abilities to answer tough questions. These applications must solve problems to structurally combine data and semantically mediate data in order to make use of them for a common task. This session will highlight innovative and proven models and data integrating analysis applications. The talk will be structured with a lead "vision statement" speaker followed by several brief lightening talks about recent advancements in environmental modeling and integration.

Moderator - Gerry Galloway
University of Maryland, College Park, MD

An Evaluation of Flow-Metric Based Stream Classification Systems to Support the Determination of Ecological Flows - Jennifer Phelan, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (co-authors: P. Jones, L.Patterson, S. Pearsall)
Hydrological Modeling for Ecological Flows at Statewide Biological Monitoring Sites - Fekadu Moreda, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (co-authors: M. Eddy, J.Allen)
Advancing Water Diplomacy for Ecological Flows as Part of Essential Water Use - Mary Lou Addor, NC State Univeristy , Raliegh, NC (co-authors: S. Pearsall, N. Sharpless, C.Perrin)
Flow Alteration - Biological Response Relationships for Benthos and Fish to Support the Determination of Ecological Flows for North Carolina - Jennifer Phelan, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (co-authors: T. Cuffney, L. Patterson, S. Pearsall, C. Goudreau, R. Dykes, J. Mead, F. Tarver)

Moderator - Elizabeth Krousel
Michael Baker International, Alexandria, VA

Retrospective Analysis of Hydrologic Impacts in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed - Harsh Beria, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (co-authors: V. Sridhar, A. Campbell, R. Burgholzer)
Cleaning the Bay the Navy Way - Joni Calmbacher, Michael Baker International, Alexandria, VA (co-authors: J. Kelly, E. Krousel, D. Cotnoir, )
Rising Air and Stream-Water Temperatures in Chesapeake Bay Region, USA - John Jastram, U.S. Geological Survey, Richmond, VA (co-author: K. C. Rice)
An Investigation into the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Hydrologic Budget under Future Climate Change Scenarios - Cheoung Hyun Seong, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (co-authors: V. Sridhar, A. Campbell, H. Beria, R. Burgholzer)

Moderator - Yamen Hoque
Texas A&M AgriLife Blackland Research & Extension Center, Temple, TX

Can Interstitial, Remnant Exterior Spaces in Our Cities Make a Difference? A Look at the Stormwater Monitoring Findings of Shoemaker Green - Emily Mccoy, Andropogon Associates, Philadelphia, PA (co-author: D. Shumpert )
Potential Sources of Iron and their Regulation of Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria in RSC Structures - Michael R. Williams, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, Solomons, MD (co-authors: B.Wessel, S.Filoso)
Environmental Monitoring of Shallow, Eutrophic, Small Lakes - Michael Saminsky, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Advances and Applications in Sediment Monitoring Using Acoustic Surrogates - Mark Landers, U.S. Geological Survey, Office of Surface Water, Norcross, GA

Moderator - Dipmani Kumar
DPWES, Fairfax County, Fairfax, VA

Investigation of Paleoflood Discharges on the West Branch of the Susquehanna River - Jessica Newlin, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA
Integrated Stream Restoration Approach for Lake Craig Recreational Area, Ashville, NC - Sivaramakrishnan Sangameswaran, Dewberry, Fairfax, VA (co-authors: M.A. Hanson, M.P. Sears, C.M. Long)
When Does Downstream Hydraulic Geometry Not Capture Spatial Stream Morphology? - Karen Prestegaard, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Comparison of One-Dimensional and Two-Dimensional Simulations of Radioactive Contaminant Transport and Fate in Kerr Reservoir in Virginia - Turgay Dabak, Michael Baker International, Alexandria, VA (co-authors: M. S. Altinakar, Y. Jia, T. Zhu, P.Pommerenk)

Moderator - Charles Padera
Kleinschmidt Associates, Pittsfield, ME

Ten Years of CEAP Watershed Assessments: Opportunities for Advances in Watershed Restoration and Conservation - Lisa Duriancik, USDA NRCS, Manassas, VA (co-authors: M. Walbridge, D.Osmond, R. Parry)
61 Years of Research on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed - Philip Heilman, USDA-ARS Southwest Watershed Research Center, Tucson, AZ (co-authors: D. Goodrich, T. Keefer, S.Moran, Mark Nearing, M. Nichols, K. Renard, R.Scott)
Water Management in Central Arizona: 50 years of Change and Innovation - Kenneth Seasholes, Central Arizona Project, Phoenix, AZ

Thursday / November 6 / 3:30 PM -5:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 79, 80, 81, 82, 83

Moderator - Jack Hampson
Atkins, Tampa, FL

Panelists:
John Dorman, Director, NC Floodplain Mapping Program, Raleigh, NC
Al Rea, Director, National Hydrography Dataset, USGS, Boise, ID
Steve Kopp, Program Manager, Esri, Redlands, CA
David Maidment, Chair in Civil Engineering, UT Austin, Austin, TX

The future of an open water-data infrastructure will be guided and funded based on its ability to meet critical decision support needs addressing changing climates and populations. Data that are available in a standardized way, comprising a wide range of water and climate data sources, are critical to better understanding past, current and future scenarios and their uncertainties. Each community and region faces unique choices distinct to their risks and vulnerabilities. The quality and availability of information underlies both the short-term and long-term success or failure of the measures and policies we enact. This panel session allows experts from a range of contributors and users to discuss what is needed, what is possible, and what are the consequences of inaction.

Moderator - Anouk Savineau
LimnoTech, Washington, DC

Combining Grant Funding, Design Assistance, and Stormwater Credit Programs to Leverage Private Sector Investment and Participation in Green Infrastructure Implementation: Lessons Learned from Philadelphia - Shandor Szalay, AKRF, Mt. Laurel, NJ
Incentivizing Green Stormwater Management in Philadelphia - Erin Williams, Philadelphia Water Department, Philadelphia, PA
The Green Edge How Commercial Property Investment in Green Infrastructure Creates Value - Larry Levine, NRDC, New York, NY
Market Policy for Green Infrastructure - David Hsu, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Moderator - Karen Bushaw-Newton
Northern Virginia Community College, Annandale, VA

DelDOT Water Quality Street Sweeping Plan: A Science-Based Methodology - William Frost, KCI Technologies, Inc., Sparks, MD (co-authors: M. Walch, B. Thompson, M.Ortynsky, K. Myers)
The 'Hard versus Soft Engineering' Paradigm and the Environmental Stabilization of Anthropogenic Streams - Todd Moses, Skelly and Loy, Inc., Harrisburg, PA
Investigation of the Effectiveness of Landscape Improvement on Downstream Flow Hydrograph at Different Return Periods - Ebrahim Ahmadisharaf, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN (co-authors: M.Ketabchy, M. Tajrishy, N. Alamdari)
The USDA Forest Service National Best Management Practices Program: Focus on Monitoring - Christopher "Kit" MacDonald Kaibab National Forest, Supervisor's Office, Williams, AZ (co-authors: L. Berger, P. Edwards, J. Carlson)

Moderator - Thomas Amidon
Kleinfelder, Princeton, NJ

Achieving Household Water-Use Efficiency Using Automated Metering Infrastructure - Allen Berthold , Texas Water Resources Institute, College Station, TX (co-authors: J. Andrus, K. Brumbelow, K. Wagner, S. Cummings)
Time Series Analysis of Drinking Water Treatment Plant Costs and Source Water Quality: A Case Study in Ohio - Matthew Heberling, US EPA, Cincinnati, OH (co-authors: C. Nietch, H. Thurston)
Contaminants in Drinking Water as a Result of Private Well Homeowner Behavior - Isabella Bergonzoli, Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches, West Palm Beach , FL (co-author: T. Thornton)

Moderator - Betsy Cody
Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC

Creating a 'Water BRAC' Commission to Evaluate Existing Water Projects - Daniel McCool, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
The Role of Geography in the Structure and Implementation of Water Governance Processes: A Case Study of the Columbia River Treaty Reviews - Kim Ogren, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
Streamflow Prediction for Micro-Hydropower Generation at Ungauged Sites - Maya Atieh, University of Guelph, Hamilton, ON, Canada (co-authors: B. Gharabaghi, R. Rudra)
Analyzing the Interconnectedness of Energy and Water Sustainability Issues: Findings from a Quantitative Study - Chu Chu, Center for Energy & Environmental Policy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (co-authors: J. Lee, K. Zame)