2016 Annual AWRA Water Resources Conference
Oral Presentations
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The Presenter of each paper is in BOLD type immediately following the paper title. Co-authors are then listed in parentheses. All abstracts in a session can be accessed using the Session Title link.

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CONFERENCE OPENING PLENARY SESSION


Monday / November 14 / 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM


Welcome and Opening Remarks

Martha Corrozi Narvaez
President, American Water Resources Association
Water Resources Agency, University of Delaware, Newark, DE

Rafael E. Frias, III
Conference General Chair
Black & Veatch Corp., Coral Springs, FL


Opening Keynote Plenary Session


Water Resources Resiliency in the United States

Moderator: David T. McGimpsey
Bingham Greenebaum Doll, Jasper, Indiana

Panelists
Aging Infrastructure
Lester Sola (Director of Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department (WASD), Miami, FL and Hardeep Anand WASD's Deputy Director for Capital Improvements Program, Miami, FL

Water and Energy Nexus
Cindy Wallis Lage, President of Black & Veatch's Water Business, Kansas City, MO

Governance
Shawn Grindstaff, Senior Dispute Resolution Counsel for US EPA, Lenexa, KS

Resiliency will first be discussed amongst each Thought Leader to define it's meaning within the water resources industry and set the tone for each panel member to contribute on their respective area of expertise.

Podcast: “Water Resources Resiliency in the U.S.”

AWRA’s 2016 Annual Conference in Orlando, FL, commenced with a Plenary Session that focused on the comprehensive topic of Water Resources Resiliency in the U.S., featuring a discussion on how Aging Infrastructure, Water and Energy Nexus, and Water Governance impact the resiliency of our water resources. The session was moderated by the creator of "The Water Values” podcast, Mr. David T. McGimpsey and included the following thought leaders from the water resources community: on the topic of Aging Infrastructure, Mr. Lester Sola and Mr. Hardeep Anand with Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department; on the topic of Water and Energy Nexus, Ms. Cindy Wallis-Lage with Black & Veatch; and on the topic of Water Governance, Mr. Shawn Grindstaff with the U.S. EPA.

The Plenary Session was recorded to be aired as the first Water Values podcast of 2017! You can listen to the thought-provoking insights from the panelists through the podcast link below. Enjoy!

http://thewatervalues.com/2017/01/03/water-resources-resiliency-mean-awra-panel-discussion/


Monday / Nov. 14 / 10:30 AM - 12:00 Noon
Concurrent Sessions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Moderator - Peter Hall Powerpoint
Amec Foster Wheeler, Portland, ME

Panelists
Jaime Torres-Springer, HR&A Advisors, Inc., New York, NY
John Williams, Impact Infrastructure, Inc., New York, NY
Hardeep Anand, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Miami, FL

The panel will discuss how defining accurate metrics (such as reduction in property damage, loss of service, and other ways to measure the frequency and severity of flooding) can help to support the long-term performance of resilience projects, to secure future funding, and to demonstrate how these projects are scalable and replicable. This panel will also review the key success factors driving city resilience and how leading originations such as 100RC are collaborating to implement solutions.

Session Takeaways:

  1. How the impacts of resilience projects can be assessed to understand the opportunities and challenges of a project
  2. The importance of articulating the resilience value of implemented projects
  3. How metrics can provide lessons for future projects
  4. Understand how cities are sharing, integrating, measuring and implementing best practices for urban resilience

PowerpointProject Design and Resilience Value Measurement: A Framework for Innovation in Measurement and Financing - Johanna Lovecchio - Johanna Lovecchio, HR&A Advisors, Inc., New York, NY (co-authors: J. Torres-Springer, R. Hutchinson, D. Stander, J. Williams, S. Torriente, R. Haag, P. Hall)

PowerpointCalculating Triple Bottom Returns on Investment from Resilience - John Williams, Impact Infrastructure, Inc., New York, NY

PowerpointImplementing Resilience to Water and Sewer Projects - Hardeep Anand, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Miami, FL

Key Success Factors for City Resilience - Amy Armstrong, 100 Resilience Cities, New York NY (invited)

Moderator - Paul Conrads
U.S. Geological Survey SAWSC, Columbia, SC

PowerpointDevelopment of a Coastal Drought Index Using Salinity Data - Paul Conrads, U.S. Geological Survey SAWSC, Columbia, SC
PowerpointLinking Coastal Drought to Ecological Response - Daniel Tufford, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (co-authors: P. Conrads, K. Lackstrom)
PowerpointDrought and Coastal Ecosystems: An Assessment of Decision Maker Needs for Information - Kirsten Lackstrom, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (co-authors: K. Dow, A. Farris, B. Haywood, D. Chalcraft, C. Nolan, D. Tufford)
PowerpointUsing the Coastal Salinity Index and Predicted Streamflow to Forecast SC Blue Crab Landings - Michael Childress, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (co-authors:v D. Tufford, J. Lu, G. Carbone, P. Conrads)

Moderator - Christine Denny
Normandeau Associates, Inc., Gainesville, FL

Powerpoint'Let's Go Put Our Heads in the Sewers:' Participatory Planning for Sea Level Rise in the SE U.S. - Jason Evans, Stetson University, DeLand, FL (co-authors: E. Dead, J. Gambill, T. Ruppert, J. Whitehead)
PowerpointBuilding Better Watershed Partnerships: Key Ingredients for Success - Ashley Hullinger, University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center, Tucson, AZ (co-authors: K. Mott Lacroix, B. Kennett, M. Apel, T. Robertson , S. Megdal)
PowerpointA Multi-Stakeholder Partnership to Protect, Manage, and Restore Our Springs: A National Estuary Program Model for the Florida Springs Coast and Beyond - Chris Anastasiou, Southwest Florida Water Management District, Tampa, FL
PowerpointDesigning a Process to Successfully Engage Stakeholders in Orange Lake Habitat Management, Florida - Christine Denny, Normandeau Associates, Inc., Gainesville, FL (co-author: F. Baird)

Moderator - Chip Paulson
MWH Americas, Inc., Denver, CO

Status Report on Water Research Foundation Project 4615: 'Framework for Evaluating Alternative Water Supplies: Balancing Cost with Reliability, Resilience, and Sustainability' - Chip Paulson, MWH Americas, Inc., Denver, CO (co-author: K. Henderson)
A Supply-Side Approach to Integrated Water Resources Planning - George Yilmaz, Collier County Public Utilities, Naples, FL (co-authors: R. Cushing, M. Pazahanick, K. Martin)
Municipality's Use of Conceptual Permitting to Provide Water Quality Treatment for Urban Redevelopment - Daniel Brundage, Agnoli, Barber, & Brundage, Inc., Naples, FL (co-authors: M. Feeney, T. Barber, M. Cull, D. Cull)
Developing an Integrated Modeling Framework for Water Management in Southeast Florida Under Future Long-Term Climate and Economic Scenarios - Neil Berg, RAND Corporation, Arlington, VA (co-authors: D. Knopman , D. Groves)
Susquehanna River Basin Cumulative Water Use & Availability Study - John W. Balay, Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Harrisburg, PA (co-authors: Z. Zhang, J. Zimmerman, P. MaCoy, C. Frank, G. Markowitz, C. Liu)

Moderator - Carol R. Collier
Academy of Natural Sciences, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA

Panelists
Andy Johnson, Watershed Protection, William Penn Foundation, Philadelphia, PA
Scott Haag, BioGeoInformatics Group, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
Carol R. Collier, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University,
Philadelphia, PA
Amanda Bassow, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), Washington, D.C.
Abigail Weinberg, Open Space Institute, New York, NY (invited)

For the last three years, 50 NGOs have been working together on the Delaware River Watershed Initiative (DRWI), a project to develop watersheds that provide clean sufficient water to support healthy ecosystems and human communities. The Initiative has been built on a strong science base with targeting of critical watersheds within the Delaware River Basin and focusing on protection of forested headwaters to protect high water quality and restoration of areas where water quality has been degraded by agricultural runoff and suburban stormwater. A watershed-wide monitoring program of chemical, biological and physical data records baseline, reference and project site changes. Over 14,000 acres of forested land have been protected in the headwaters and 6000 acres of agricultural and suburban lands restored to reduce stormwater runoff. The team is now preparing for Phase II of the effort and has a number of actions in place to make the Initiative more rigorous and environmentally effective. Based on lessons learned from Phase I and better defined goals and outcomes, a program has been developed to shape action plans for the next six years. Products and programs to support a strong Phase II include an assessment and ranking of threats, theory of change analysis, development of layered metrics, a stream reach assessment tool (SRAT) to facilitate the most effective use of on-the-ground capital, new website and communication tools, enhanced citizen monitoring programs, research grants to fill in critical knowledge gaps, watershed- based funding options, and assistance to municipalities to promote stronger environmental ordinances and encouraging open space protection. Lessons learned and suggestions for similar programs will be discussed. If time allows, a 12 minute documentary will be shown.

Moderator - Dan Rodrigo
CDM Smith, Los Angeles, CA

Powerpoint Session Powerpoint

Panelists
Scott Kelly
, Assistant City Administrator, City of West Palm Beach, West Palm Beach, FL
Bill Young, Director of Utilities, St. Johns County Utility Department, St. Augustine, FL
Dan Johnson, Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District, Atlanta, GA
Scott McClelland, CDM Smith, Tampa, FL

 

Ensuring safe and reliable drinking water, protecting water quality of receiving waters, and stormwater management have traditionally been achieved by agencies working in silos. Increasingly, challenges such as extreme climate, aging infrastructure, new environmental regulations, and lack of adequate financial resources have made this old model of water resources management more difficult to execute. A new paradigm of "One Water" management is emerging that views all water through integrated lenses, where more opportunities for sustainable water become unveiled and increased resiliency is achieved. By breaking down the silos in water management, water agencies in the Southeast United States are using water more efficiently through smart conservation practices, reusing treated wastewater for water supply, capturing stormwater and reducing flooding through multipurpose green infrastructure, and improving the water quality of our natural receiving waters. And these integrated solutions have the benefit of being more cost-effective than the traditional "silo" solutions to solving these problems. This moderated panel special session will include case studies of integrated water resources management in Florida and Georgia. Participating water agency representatives will make a brief presentation highlighting their unique attributes and innovative efforts for One Water management, and then participate in a moderated questions and answers period. The session is intended to be engaging with the panel members, audience and moderator.

The panel will include discussion from each panel member on case studies including:

 

  • Developing Alternative Water Supplies Using an Integrated Systems Modeling Approach: The use of integrated systems modeling and decision support tools to develop a long-term plan for alternative water supply development for the City of West Palm Beach. The process examined the interaction between water, wastewater and stormwater in order to evaluate non-traditional water supplies and ensure reliability and resiliency under historical and climate-changed droughts.
  • Developing an Integrated Water Resources Plan to Improve Long-Term Reliability and Resiliency: The development of an Integrated Water Resources Plan for St. Johns County. The plan identified and characterized dozens of water supply, stormwater and wastewater alternatives, evaluated the alternatives against multiple objectives, tested the alternatives against future scenarios of growth and climate, and involved public stakeholders throughout the process.
  • Incorporating Climate Resiliency into Regional Integrated Water Resources Management: Incorporation of climate resiliency into regional integrated water resources management for the North Georgia metropolitan area. Climate scenarios were developed and analyzed for potential impacts on water demands, reservoirs, water quality, watersheds, and critical water/wastewater infrastructure. How the results from this study are being used within the context of regional integrated water resources management will also be highlighted.
  • Solving Stormwater Management and Water Quality Goals Using Integrated Water Resources Planning: How integrated water resources planning was used in Pinellas County to achieve stormwater and water quality goals. The effort used an integrated systems model to evaluate alternatives from multiple viewpoints. The process involved workshops with all relevant county departments as well as a representative from the regional water management district in Florida.

 

Monday / Nov. 14 / 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Moderator - Carol Lippincott
University of Florida Water Institute, Gainesville, FL

PowerpointPhosphorus Storage in Coastal Sediments: Will Sea-Level Rise Mobilize P and Elevate Coastal Fluxes? - Andrea Pain, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (co-authors: C. Young, J. B. Martin)
Florida's Spring-Fed, Coastal Rivers: Past, Present and Future - Thomas Frazer, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (co-authors: C. A. Jacoby, S. K. Notestein)
PowerpointA 65-Yr Migration of Sea-Level Rise Hot Spots Along the U.S. Atlantic Coast - Arnoldo Valle-Levinson, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (co-authors: A. Dutton, J. Martin)
PowerpointForecasting Coastal Forest Die-Off in the Lower Suwannee Refuge: Influence of Climate Drivers and Island Characteristics - Katie Glodzik, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (co-author: D. Kaplan)

Moderator - Josh Weiss
Hazen and Sawyer, Baltimore, MD

PowerpointTowards a Basin-Wide Drought Planning Tool in the Susquehanna River Basin - Josh Weiss, Hazen and Sawyer, Baltimore, MD (co-authors: K. Hoffman, B. Pratt, J. Balay, R. Palmer, K. Booras, C. Howells)
PowerpointImproving Estimates of Extreme Drought through Streamflow Simulation - Bill Szafranski, Lynker Technologies, Inc., Boulder, CO (co-author: B. Harding)
PowerpointEvaluating Weather and Streamflow Forecast Skill for Use in Water Supply System Operations - Leslie Decristofaro, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA (co-author: R. Palmer)
PowerpointEvaluating the Impact of Scaling Methods on the Skill of Ensemble Streamflow Forecasts: A Case Study of the City of Baltimore Water Supply - Alexandra McIntyre, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA (co-authors: R. Palmer, K. Booras)

Moderator - Karen Trebitz
University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

PowerpointTime to Engage? How Regional Stakeholders Work Together to Address Bi-State Water Management Strategies in a Collaborative Modeling Process - Melanie Thornton, WSU, Pullman, WA (co-authors: A. Beall King, J. Johnson)
PowerpointBridging Between Organizations for Effective Water Resource Management; A Look at a Stakeholder Network in Water Governance Issues of a Rural Subbasin - Karen Trebitz, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID
PowerpointGrassroots Campaign to Restore Hypereutrophic Lake by Hydraulic Dredging of Nutrient-laden Sediments and Subsequent Coordination of Management Actions to Address Broader Watershed Issues - Joseph Schmidt, South Florida Water Management District, Naples, FL
PowerpointEvaluating the Knowledge of Self-Reported Environmentalists' Regarding Incentives and Enforcements of the Everglades Federal Mandates - Benjamin Garelick, Oxbridge Academy, West Palm Beach FL (co-author: T.E. Thornton

Moderator - Michael Campana
Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

PowerpointIntegrated Water Resource Management of Freshwater in Louisiana Beginning with Surface Water Modeling - Michele Eddy, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (co-authors: B. Piazza, D. Harlan, K. Sparks, J. Allen)
PowerpointThe Groundwater Visibility Initiative: An Idea Whose Time Has Come - Michael Campana, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (co-authors: L. Beutler, J. C. Tracy, S. B. Megdal, W. Alley)
Improving Integrated Surface Water and Groundwater Management in the United States: Three Case Studies of Innovative Regional Groundwater Governance Approaches - Sharon B. Megdal, University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center, Tucson, AZ (co-authors: A. K. Gerlak, R. G. Varady, L.Huang, N. H. Delano)
Decision Support for Assessing the Socio-Economic Value of a Regionalized Water Supply - Karin Sjöstrand, SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Lund, Sweden (co-authors: L. Rosén, E. Kärrman, L. Blom, J. Lindkvist, M. Ivarsson, L-O. Lång, A. Lindhe)

Moderator - Lynette Cardoch
HDR, Miami, FL

Panelists

PowerpointLen Materman, San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority, Menlo Park, CA
SAFER Bay: A Phased Investment Approach to Protecting Against Sea Level Rise

PowerpointAkin Owosina, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL
SFMWD Integrated System of Flood Protection and the Link with Level of Service in a Changing Environment

PowerpointAntonio Cotarelo, Deputy Director of Operations, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department. Miami, FL
Operational Considerations for a Coastal Utility

This session will focus on riverine and coastal systems and the policy and funding challenges, opportunities, and trade-offs associated with implementing these on a regional scale. Important in the discussion will be socio-economic concerns, environmental issues at the habitat rich shoreline, and operational considerations. The speakers will be asked to incorporate their case studies dealing with:

  • Diverse stakeholders and financing strategies;
  • Connecting flood protection with ecosystem and recreational enhancements;
  • Pluvial flooding concerns in riverine and coastal systems;
  • Sea-level rise, storm surge: tradeoffs/considerations with structural protections and interior drainage, groundwater/water table;
  • Green infrastructure; and,
  • Social and economic considerations in their communities

SAFER Bay: A Phased Investment Approach to Protecting Against Sea Level Rise - Len Materman, San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority, Menlo Park, CA

Moderator - Lara Fowler
Penn State Law/Penn State Institutions of Energy and the Environment, University Park, PA

The Western Water Dashboard: Debunking Common Perceptions of Western Groundwater Management - Debra Perrone, Water in the West, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (co-author: R. L. Nelson)
PowerpointHow and When: Institutional Change in Water Resource Governance in the Inland Northwest - Allyson Beall King, WSU, Pullman, WA (co-author: M. Thornton)
PowerpointInterbasin Transfers in the Contiguous United States - Kerim Dickson, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (co-author: D. Dzombak)
PowerpointFinding a Path Forward: Resolving Conflicts in the Water World - Lara Fowler, Penn State Law/Penn State Institutes of Energy & the Environment, University Park, PA and Shawn Grindstaff, Senior Dispute Resolution Counsel for USEPA, Lenexa, KS


Monday / Nov. 14 / 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

Moderator - Carol Lippincott
University of Florida Water Institute, Gainesville, FL

PowerpointImpacts of Chronic Low-Level Salinity on the Productivity and Resilience of Coastal Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum) Swamps - Elliott White, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (co-authors: D. Kaplan, B. Middleton)
Sea-Level Rise Modeling Handbook: Methods and Models of Water Resource Use and Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems - Thomas Doyle, U.S. Geological Survey, Lafayette, LA (co-author: B. Chivoiu)
PowerpointProactive Risk Management: Fema's Mitigation Support for Climate Resiliency - Lena Rivera, CDM Smith, Maitland, FL (co-authors: E. Kenney, N. LaRosa)
PowerpointAnalysis of Microbial Communities Associated With Groundwater Discharge in the Yucatan Peninsula - Laibin Huang, Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (co-authors: C. Young, A. Pain, J. B. Martin, A. Ogram)

Moderator - Noel Gollehon, NRCS-USDA, Beltsville, MD

PowerpointIncome from Water: An Examination of Crop Sales from Agricultural Irrigation - Noel Gollehon, NRCS-USDA, Beltsville, MD
PowerpointFreshwater Use Valuation for the St. Johns River Basin, Florida, USA - Chris Brown, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL (co-author: C. McKeon)
PowerpointUtilizing Operations Research to optimize Capital Improvement Scheduling - Bruce Rindahl, Ventura County, Ventura, CA (co-author: S. Holder)

Moderator - Teresa Thornton
Oxbridge Academy, West Palm Beach, FL

PowerpointEncouraging Community-Based Graduate Level Water Research in Secondary Education - Teresa Thornton, Oxbridge Academy, West Palm Beach, FL
Jumping into the Deep-end of the Ocean: Adventures in Experiential Education Via Project-based Learning - Debra Woodall, Daytona State College, Daytona Beach, FL
PowerpointWater Resources Education at Florida Gulf Coast University: Watershed Science and Policy as a Springboard to Critical Thinking - Don Duke, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL
PowerpointRedefining the 'Engineer' In Water Resources Engineering - Joshua Joseph, Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA

Moderator - Martha Narvaez
University of Delaware, Newark, DE

Panelists
Brenda Bateman, Oregon Water Resources Dept., & AWRA Board of Directors, Salem, OR
Carol Collier, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, & AWRA Past President, Philadelphia, PA
Jane Rowan, Normandeau Associates, Inc., & AWRA Past President, Stowe, PA
Lara Fowler, Penn State University & AWRA Conference Technical Program Co-Chair,
University Park, PA
Melinda Dalton, U.S. Geological Survey, Hapeville, GA

As I watched the White House Summit this past March I was pleasantly surprised to see the number of women in leadership roles at the summit. I was even more struck when one of the presenters noted the strong leadership roles women have played in water throughout the Obama administration. This comment made me extremely proud and led me to think about the leadership roles AWRA women have played in the water resources field internationally, nationally and at the state-level. This session will include a panel of women who have been actively involved in AWRA and have proven to be strong leaders in AWRA as well as in the water resources field. Each panelist will be asked to provide a brief background on their education and professional experience. This will be followed by Q&A regarding their experiences in the field. Questions may be shaped based on a questionnaire developed for the national AWRA blog and will also be based on discussions and questions from the audience. This will be an interactive panel and the intention is to provide the audience with a snapshot of the leadership and expertise of a few of our best AWRA women.

Moderator - Jordan Fischbach
RAND Corporation, Pittsburg, PA

PowerpointOcean Acidification and Its Projected Impacts on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Missions - Paula Kullberg, USACE, Concord, MA (co-authors: C. Cerco, K.White)
PowerpointRising Temperature Dominates the Future Change in U.S. Water Availability - Kai Duan, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (co-authors: G. Sun, S. G. McNulty, P. V. Caldwell, E. C. Cohen, S. Sun Nanjing, H. D. Aldridge, Y. Zhang)
Climate-Resilient Stormwater Management in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania - Jordan Fischbach, RAND Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (co-authors: K. Siler-Evans, D. Tierney, M.Wilson)

Moderator - Sandra Fox
St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL

Speakers
Introduction to the National Water Model
PowerpointDavid Maidment, University of Texas, Austin, TX
"The National Water Model: A Local Perspective"
PowerpointRahim Harji and James R. Bernard, Pinellas County, Clearwater, FL
“Florida’s Deranged Hydrology and the National Water Model, Challenges and Opportunities”
PowerpointPeter Singhofen, Streamline Technologies, Inc., Winter Springs, FL

Panelists
David Maidment, University of Texas, Austin, TX
Peter Singhofen, Streamline Technologies, Inc., Winter Springs, FL
Rahim Harji, Pinellas County, Clearwater, FL
Dean Djokic, ESRI, Redlands, CA
Stephen Bourne, Atkins Global, West Palm Beach, FL
Rafael E. Frias III, Black & Veatch, Coral Springs, FL

The National Weather Service has created a National Water Model to provide real]time flood and water flow forecasting at high spatial resolution throughout the continental United States, including 30,000 reaches covering 41,000 km of streams and rivers in Florida.

Florida has particular drainage patterns that are challenging for inclusion in a standardized model of national scope. There are many local observation networks for water level and flow that could be linked to the National Water Model to improve its accuracy using the principles of the Open Water Data Initiative. The purpose of this session is to describe the application of the National Water Model in Florida and examine how best to enhance that with local knowledge and data.

Tuesday / Nov. 15 / 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Concurrent Sessions 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24

Moderator - Steven Memberg
South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

Panelists
PowerpointSteven Memberg, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL
PowerpointElizabeth D. Ross, Gunster, West Palm Beach, FL
PowerpointRay Scott, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Tallahassee, FL
PowerpointBrian Wheeler, Toho Water Authority, Kissimmee, FL

Recognizing the increasingly important role reclaimed water supplies play in balancing the water equation, in 2014 Florida's Legislature passed a bill requiring a comprehensive study to determine, in part, how the use of reclaimed water could be expanded to assist in meeting future demands. Published in 2015, the report identified a number of impediments and constraints to increasing the use of reclaimed water including regulation and cost. While not regulated as a supply source, reclaimed water reuse must be synchronized with the permitting system. Florida's Legislature has indicated that additional incentives to reclaimed water are imperative to increasing its use. This two- part course of advanced discussion will focus on the latest issues occurring in the reuse arena including end user concerns, supplementation of reclaimed water from other sources, and regional effects on water quality and water quantity. The panel will represent a diverse cross section of government, utility, environmental, and agricultural interests.

Moderator - Luna Phillips
Gunster, Fort Lauderdale, FL

Panelists
PowerpointChurch Roberts, Johnson Engineering, Inc., Fort Myers, FL
Tom MacVicar, MacVicar Consulting, West Palm Beach, FL
PowerpointLen Lindahl, South Florida Water Management District. West Palm Beach, FL
PowerpointTimothy Murphy, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

This panel will focus on issues facing the management of Lake Okeechobee (Lake) and the estuaries and its effects on water supply, water resources, and environmental restoration throughout south Florida. The panel represents a diverse cross section of Government (state, federal and local), private landowners, tribal entities, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and agricultural. The panel will discuss how lake management decisions affect their differing interests and obligations and the varying issues that must be balanced to make decisions. They will focus on the very latest developments affecting the Lake, including the newly passed water policy legislation, status of Lake Okeechobee Regulation Schedule (LORS), schedule and effect of the Hebert Hoover Dike (HHD) repair, endangered species, and status of Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) projects and what can be expected over the coming year. The panel will be structured as a Q&A, with interaction form the audience. Materials will include limited PowerPoint slides with maps and other information to guide discussion.

Moderator - Casey Fitzgerald
St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL

Powerpoint2016 Legislative Advances in Florida Springs Protection and Restoration - Thomas Frick, Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection, Tallahassee, FL
PowerpointA Springs Protection Initiative for Northeast Florida: Reversing the Fate of Florida's Iconic Springs via Science, Projects and Enlightened Management - Casey Fitzgerald, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL
PowerpointSolving Scientific Mysteries Surrounding Florida's Springs: A Collaborative Investigation of Potential Drivers - Dean Dobberfuhl, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL
PowerpointBaseline Ecological Characterization of 14 Florida Springs - Jennifer Sagan, Amec Foster Wheeler, Newberry, FL (co-authors: M. Guyette, M. Szafraniec, K. Deliz, S. McMorrow, R. Mansuetti, A. Chapman)

PowerpointModerator - Edward Sherwood
Tampa Bay Estuary Program, St. Petersburg, FL

Panelists
Anthony Janicki, Janicki Environmental Inc., St. Petersburg, FL
Jeffry Greenwell, Hillsborough County Public Utilities Department, Tampa, FL
PowerpointSantino Provenzano, Mosaic Fertilizer, LLC, Lithia, FL

The proactive and adaptive nutrient management plan for the Tampa Bay watershed has evolved over the past quarter century largely from local efforts implemented by the Tampa Bay Nitrogen Management Consortium (NMC) which has been coordinated by the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) since 1998. The NMC, an ad hoc public- private partnership, now consists of more than 50 local governments, industries, utilities and agricultural stakeholders that have worked cooperatively to help support the TBEP's efforts to recover seagrass in Tampa Bay through the watershed implementation of total nitrogen (TN) load reduction projects. To date, and of those projects that have reported costs, the NMC has invested over $648 million in various nutrient reduction projects in Tampa Bay, which has led to the preclusion of approximately 537 tons of TN from entering the bay each year. The NMC's efforts have resulted in vast reductions in nitrogen loadings to Tampa Bay as compared to levels in the 1970's, and as a result, has contributed to Tampa Bay's ecosystem recovery. Presently, the Tampa Bay seagrass recovery goal to restore acreages to 1950's levels has been achieved. However, future challenges still exist. The Tampa Bay region continues to expand in population and potential expansion and introduction of new sources of TN loads to the bay is a possibility. Therefore, the NMC continues to implement new N load projects in a collaborative and consensus-driven process. This presentation will further discuss the formation of the NMC, its role in contributing to Tampa Bay's ecosystem recovery, and planned future work to maintain a "healthy" Tampa Bay.

Moderator - Kyle Juracek
U.S. Geological Survey, Lawrence, KA

Challenges of Managing Reservoir Sedimentation in the Real World - Rollin Hotchkiss, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
Continuous Monitoring of Suspended Sediment for Reservoir Management - Kyle Juracek, U.S. Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (co-authors: C. Lee, C. Gnau)
The Challenge of Maintaining, Restoring or Increasing Effective Available Storage Capacity in High Energy Environments in Southern CA, USA - Frank Weirich, IIHR Hydroscience & Engineering and Dept. of EES - U of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
Suitability of River Delta Sediment as Proppant, Missouri River Near Lewis and Clark Lake, Nebraska-South Dakota - Robert Swanson, U.S. Geological Survey, Lincoln, NE (co-authors: R. Zelt, C. M. Hobza, B. L. Burton)
Potential Downstream Effects of Sediment Trapping by Dams on the Mekong - Kyle Juracek (USGS) presenting for G. Mathias Kondolf, University of California, Berkeley, CA (co-author: Z. Rubin)

Moderators - Sandra Fox, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL
and Jack C. Hampson, Atkins, North America, Inc., Tampa, FL

The AWRA Technology technical committee is pleased to host a new kind of conference session: the Technology Showcase. In response to the call for "Lightning Talk" proposals, the Technology Committee has selected presentations that specifically describe and/or demonstrate new and exciting technologies in water resources. Presentations will include new hardware solutions in sensors, data loggers, computer hardware, handheld devices and related tools. Software technology presentations will include new models, data management systems, web services, mobile and web apps, and related tools. Nontraditional presentations that include live demonstrations of hardware or software are encouraged.
Academic, agency, commercial and open source technology presentations as well as graduate student talks, will be included. Many of these introductory talks will point to other sessions where more fully developed talks will cover case studies. Lightning talks are very short]no more than 5 minutepresentations. These research talks are succinct in nature and will quickly define motivation, implications and impacts of the work. While there is no time allotted for discussion or questions during the session, a lunch and/or coffee break follow these sessions so that participants can connect and
converse. Contact information for lightning talks speakers will be made available in the final program.

View powerpoints - Powerpoint Powerpoint Powerpoint

Speakers

  1. Five Minutes to Greater Fulfillment and a Better Webinar - Michael Campana AWRA, Middleburg, VA
  2. Innovative Use of Drones to Build Orthorectified Images and 3D Models - Steve Kopp, ESRI, Redlands, CA
  3. A New Mapping Tool for Illustrating Groundwater Withdrawal Magnitudes - Daniel Goode, USGS Pennsylvania Science Center, Exton, PA
  4. HydroFlows and OysterFlows Apps within The Nature Conservancy's Freshwater Network - Michele Eddy, RTI, International, Research Triangle, NOC
  5. Integrated Riparian Buffer, Wetland, and Ephemeral Gully Components within the USDA Annualized Agricultural Non-Point Source (AnnAGNPS) Watershed Model - Lindsey Yasarer, USDA-ARS, Oxford, MS
  6. Innovative Hydroacoustic 3D Velocity Data Collection and Mapping in Support of Dynamic Systems Modeling on Silver River, Florida - John Sloat, WaterCube, Daniel Island, SC
  7. Advancements in LiDAR-derived DEMs - Sandra Fox, SJRWMD, Palatka, FL
  8. HEC-RAS Water Quality Modeling Capabilities - Zhonglong Zhang, ERDC, Woodland, CA
  9. The Freshwater Network: An Open Source Platform for Freshwater Decision Support - David Harlan, TNC, Baton Rouge, LA
  10. Impact of Drains Leakage on Groundwater Quality and Quantity - Abd El Rahman Mahmoud Mohamed Said, Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation, Damas, Egypt
  11. Future Proofing Cities - Steve Bourne, ATKINS North America, Inc., Milledgeville, GA
  12. Very High Resolution Remote Sensing - Christian Newman, APEM, Gainesville, FL
  13. Planning for Water Infrastructure Resilience - Pam Kenel, Black & Veatch, Gaithersburg, MD
  14. SFWMD Water Infrastructure Life Cycle Forecasting - Jack Hampson, Atkins North America, Tampa, FL
  15. Leaders Innovation Forum for Technology (LIFT) - Green Infrastructure - Harry Zhang, WERF, Alexandria, VA


Tuesday / Nov. 15 / 10:30 AM - 12:00 Noon
Concurrent Sessions 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

Moderator - Melissa Meeker
Water Environment & Reuse Foundation, Alexandria, VA

Panelists
PowerpointEnrique Vadiveloo, Hazen and Sawyer, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
PowerpointKatie Bell, MWH now a part of Stantec, Brentwood, TN
PowerpointEva-Steinle-Darling, Carollo Engineers, Inc, Austin, TX
PowerpointWendy Broley, Brown and Caldwell, San Diego, CA

Potable reuse has been practiced safely across the country for decades. With the continuation of water scarcity and growing demand, direct potable reuse has seen attention and promise like never before. This session will explore advanced technologies, operations, and planning for potable reuse. Projects funded by the Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (formerly Water Reuse Research Foundation) will be presented, including key examples in CA, AZ, FL, and GA, and a panel discussion will follow.

Moderator - Pete Quasius
Audubon of the Western Everglades, Fort Myers, FL

Panelists
PowerpointDennis Duke, Department of Interior, Office of the Secretary, OERI Davie, FL
PowerpointRobert V. Sobczak, Big Cypress National Preserve, Ochopee, FL
Ed Tamson, Teddy Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, Naples, FL

Big Cypress National Preserve is one of the headwaters for the historic Everglades, Florida Bay, and Ten Thousand Islands, but is significantly altered by roads, canals, and drainage. Some hydrological restoration projects are congressionally authorized and Army Corps approved. A CORPS/WMD planning process for additional projects for the Western Everglades/Big Cypress is underway. The completion of these projects would result in significant improvement to wildlife habitat in the Big Cypress and hydrological benefits to Mullet Slough, Everglades National Park, Florida Bay, and the 10,000 Islands. A Master Plan for Hydrological Restoration of the Big Cypress has been on the shelf since 1998 but not implemented because of a lack of funding, although numerous small projects have been completed.

Moderator - Serge Thomas
Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL

PowerpointUrban Ponds: Balancing Management of Healthy Ponds with Public Perceptions - Katie Laakkonen, City of Naples, Naples, FL
Southwest Florida Stormwater Ponds have Morphed from Ecological Filters to Landscape Features - Serge Thomas, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL
PowerpointGroundwater Seepage Nutrient Loading in a Recently Dug Wet Detention Stormwater Pond - Mark Lucius, Florida Gulf Coast University , Fort Myers , FL (co-author: S. Thomas)
Wet Detention Ponds for Stormwater Treatment: Evaluation of Compliance and Effectiveness in Lee County, FL - Drew Liddick, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL (co-author: L. D. Duke)

Moderator - Maureen Wingfield
GHD Services, Inc., Tampa, FL

PowerpointChallenges in Planning, Design and Construction of Coastal and Island Infrastructures to Adapt to New Flood Elevations and Climate Changes - Maureen Wingfield, GHD Services, Inc., Tampa, FL (co-authors: M. Drainville, K. Wong)
PowerpointIncorporating Resilience into Water Resource Planning - Robert Osborne, Black & Veatch, Greenville, SC
PowerpointMiami-Dade Water and Sewer Department: The Path to Becoming a Resilient Utility - Hardeep Anand, Miami-Dade Water & Sewer Dept., Miami, FL (co-author: L. Sola)

Moderator - Anthony Comerio
Hanson Professional Services, Inc., Springfield, IL

PowerpointDesign and Construction of a Flow Equalization Basin to Optimize Performance of Everglades Stormwater Treatment Areas - Brent Anderson, NorthStar Contracting Group, Inc., Riverview, FL (co-authors: P. Keith, A. Rosato, J. C. McBryan)
PowerpointPintos and Cadillacs: Designing and Constructing Above Ground Impoundments to Suit Florida's Water Quality and Supply Needs - Richard LeBlanc, HDR Engineering, Inc, Tampa, FL
Drought Solution for Coffeen Lake: A Look at the Permitting and Design of an Main-Channel Gate Structure for Water Supply - Anthony Comerio, Hanson Professional Services Inc., Springfield, IL

Moderators - Sandra Fox, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL
and Jack C. Hampson, Atkins, North America, Inc., Tampa, FL

The AWRA Technology technical committee is pleased to host a new kind of conference session: the Technology Showcase. In response to the call for "Lightning Talk" proposals, the Technology Committee has selected presentations that specifically describe and/or demonstrate new and exciting technologies in water resources. Presentations will include new hardware solutions in sensors, data loggers, computer hardware, handheld devices and related tools. Software technology presentations will include new models, data management systems, web services, mobile and web apps, and related tools. Nontraditional presentations that include live demonstrations of hardware or software are encouraged. Academic, agency, commercial and open source technology presentations as well as graduate student talks, will be included. Many of these introductory talks will point to other sessions where more fully developed talks will cover case studies. Lightning talks are very short]no more than 5 minutepresentations. These research talks are succinct in nature and will quickly define motivation, implications and impacts of the work. While there is no time allotted for discussion or questions during the session, a lunch and/or coffee break follow these sessions so that participants can connect and converse. Contact information for lightning talks speakers will be made available in the final program.

Power Point Presentations: Powerpoint Powerpoint

Speakers

  1. What's the Heck is a Hydrologic Feature and Why Should You Care? - David Blodgett, USGS, Middleton, WI
  2. Introduction to the National Water Model - Ed Clark /Brian Cosgrove, NOAA NWS, Tuscaloosa, AL
  3. Big Data, Cloud Computing and Web Services: The National Water Model as a Use Case - Steve Kopp, ESRI, Redlands, CA
  4. Downscaling and Upscaling Models and Model Results in Re: The National Water Model - Steve Bourne, ATKINS North America, Inc., Milledgeville, GA
  5. Using HydroShare and Tethys Apps to Access with the National Water Model Forecast Data - Dan Ames, BYU, Provo, UT
  6. NOAA NWS Innovators Program: Flood Emergency Response - Adnan Rajib, Purdue, West Lafayette, IN
  7. Network Visualizations of Water Infrastructure in California at Multiple Scales - Erik Porse, UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, Los Angeles, CA
  8. A New Competitor in 2D Modeling: Complex Comparison of HEC-RAS 5.0 and AdH - Scott Arends, Hanson Professional Services Inc., Springfield, IL
  9. Deriving Discharge with Quantified Uncertainty Using Index Velocity Observations: A Probabilistic Machine Learning Approach - Touraj Farahmand, Aquatic Informatics, Vancouver, BC, Canada
  10. Results of the National Hydrography Requirements and Benefits Study - Stephen S. Aichele, USGS, New Cumberland, PA
  11. The National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and National Hydrography Dataset Plus (NHDPlus) - Alan Rea, USGS, Boise, ID
  12. Visualizating Sea Level Rise - Pete Singhofen, Streamline Technologies Inc., Winter Springs, FL
  13. Accessing and Interpreting the National Water Census Data Portal using R - Jake Nelson, BYU, Provo, UT
  14. The Wyoming Water and Climate Web Atlas - Christopher Nicholson, University of Wyoming, Water Resources Data System & State Climate Office, Laramie, WY


Tuesday / Nov. 15 / 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36

Moderator - Adelere E. Adeniran
University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria

New Normal of Wastewater Reuse in Southern California for Long-term Sustainability and Regional Self-Reuse - Oliver Slosser, MWH Global, Pasadena, CA (co-authors: A. Syed, Y. Sun, P. Kalaria )
PowerpointFrom Groundwater to Surface Water, Desalination- and Now Reclaimed Water: Tampa Bay Water Explores Potable Reuse as an Alternate Water Supply - Ivana Kajtezovic, Tampa Bay Water, Clearwater, FL (co-authors: A. Dieffenthaller, A. Adams)
Probabilistic and Risk Analysis of the Usage of Reclaimed Water from Slow Sand Filtration Tertiary Treatment of Constructed Wetland Domestic Wastewater - Adelere Ezekiel Adeniran, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria (co-author: O. Itive)

Moderator - Ray Scott
Florida Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Tallahassee, FL

Water Quality in the Everglades: Agriculture's Perspective - Barbara J. Miedema, Sugar Cane Growers Cooperative of Florida, Belle Glade, FL
PowerpointCentral Florida Water Initiative and Ag Water Conservation - James Fletcher, University of Florida, Apopka , FL
PowerpointAgriculture's Role in Florida Water Policy - Rich Budell, Budell Water Group, LLC, Tallahassee, FL
TCAA Partnership - Eric Hjort, Tater Farms LLC, Hastings, FL (co-author: K. Hallas)

Moderator - Jeremy McBryan
South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

PowerpointConstructed Wetlands to Improve Everglades Water Quality: Two Decades of Progress and Future Restoration Strategies - Jeremy McBryan, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL
PowerpointEverglades Restoration Progress in Southwest Florida - Rod Braun, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL (co-author: J. Starnes)
PowerpointThe Kissimmee River Restoration Project: Proof That Large Scale Ecosystem Restoration is Possible - David Colangelo, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL
PowerpointIntegrated Surface Water - Groundwater - Phosphorus Model to Evaluate Changes in Land Management in Agricultural Basins North of the Everglades, Florida - Maria Loinaz, ADA Engineering, Inc., Tampa, FL (co-authors: S. Long, B. Whitefield, G. Vince, J. Leeds, J. McBryan)

Moderator - Heidi Moritz
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Gresham, OR

Potential Evapotranspiration as a Source of Uncertainty and Bias in Hydrologic Impact Analyses - P.C.D. Milly, U.S. Geological Survey, Princeton, NJ (co-author: K. A. Dunne)
PowerpointIncorporating Climate Change Impacts to Inland Hydrology - Climate Hydrology Assessment Tool - Peter Seman, USACE, Hanover, NH (co-authors: B. Baker, J. Gade)
More than Just a Rain Shadow Effect - Stabilization Mechanism in Basin Water Circulation - Hong-Quan Zhang, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK
Improving Data Collection and Management for MS4 Programs and in Developing and Maintaining TMDL Strategies - Mehmet Boz, KCI Technologies, Inc., San Antonio, TX and Amanda O'Shea, KCI Technologies, Inc., Brentwood, TN

Moderator - Gregg Jones
Cardno, Tampa, FL

PowerpointInvestigation of the Mechanisms for Mobilization of Arsenic in Two Aquifer Storage and Recovery Systems in Southwest Central Florida - Gregg Jones, Cardno, Wesley Chapel, FL
PowerpointPermitting Aquifer Storage/Aquifer Recharge Systems Using Tools Recently Sanctioned by the U.S. EPA - David Kelly, Cardno, Riverview, FL
PowerpointModeling and Operational Testing of the First Direct Aquifer Recharge System in Florida at the South Hillsborough Aquifer Recharge Project - Bart Weiss, Water Environment and Reuse Foundation, Tampa, Fla (co-authors: J. Greenwell, D. Adam)
PowerpointHampton Roads Sanitation District's Sustainable Water Recycling Initiative (SWRI) - John Dano, HRSD, Virginia Beach, VA (co-author: T. Henifin)

Moderator - Rick Koehler
NOAA/NWS, Boulder, CO

PowerpointEffective Data Visualization for Public Communication: An Example of the Hydrologic Ensemble Forecast System - Kathryn Semmens, Nurture Nature Center, Easton, PA (co-authors: B. Montz, R. Hogan Carr, K. Maxfield)
PowerpointNOAA National Water Model - Big Data Big Challenges - Edward Clark, NOAA, National Water Center, Tuscaloosa, AL (co-authors: B. Cosgrove, F. Salas, B. Lee, K. Eicher)
Network Visualizations of Water Infrastructure in California at Multiple Scales - Erik Porse, UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, Los Angeles, CA (co-author: S. Pincetl)
PowerpointHydroShare: Advancing Hydrologic Big Data through Modular Visualization and Analytics - Dan Ames, Brigham Young University, UT (co-authors: R. Idaszak, D. G. Tarboton, D. P. Ames, L.Band, A. Couch, S. Crawley, P. Dash, N. Jones, J. L. Goodall, R. Hooper, J. S. Horsburgh, D. (Zhiyu) Li, D. Maidment, V. Merwade, J. Nelson, C. Song, M. Stealey, N. Swain, H. Yi)


Tuesday / Nov. 15 / 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42

Moderator - Lisa Beutler
MWH (now part of Stantec), Sacramento, CA

AWRA was an early champion of advancing integrate water resource management (IWRM), but as water professionals turned their attention to sustainable water management, the promise of IWRM appeared to fade. Is IWRM just another casualty of management du jour or does it deserve another look as essential to achieving sustainable outcomes? During this session the AWRA IWRM Technical Committee will engage participants in an assessment of whether or not IWRM has passed its prime and to what extent it needs to be aligned with the heightened emphasis on sustainability. The discussion will also include consider what the next steps for IWRM should be.

Moderator - Claire Muirhead
St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL

Panelists
PowerpointMark A. Hammond, Southwest Florida Water Management District, Brooksville, FL
PowerpointBrian Wheeler, Toho Water Authority, Kissimmee, FL
PowerpointSteven Memberg, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

Central Florida Water Initiative (CFWI) is easily Florida's most important and far-reaching inter-district water management analysis ever undertaken. The recently completed CFWI 2015 Regional Water Supply Plan identified measures to achieve water resource sustainability in the CFWI Planning Area, which includes five central Florida counties. The continuation of the collaborative process involving three water management districts, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, several regional public water utilities, landowners, local government, and various other stakeholder interests will continue through 2020. Goals and guiding principles of CFWI include reviewing and updating sustainable sources of traditional water supplies, advancing strategies to meet water demands exceeding available supplies, providing for consistency among WMDs in implementing rules and regulations, and encouraging funding for regional strategies to achieve water supply goals and objectives. This important effort has already resulted in changes to Florida water law and policy, with this year's passing of legislation requiring collaboration and uniformity in this region's water use regulation and water supply planning.

Moderator - Gretchen Ehlinger
US Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville, FL

PowerpointProgress on South Florida Estuaries Restoration: C-111 Spreader Canal and Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetland CERP Projects - Bahram Charkhian, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL (co-author: M. Shafer)
PowerpointHydrologic Impacts from a Large Southwest Florida Development and Subsequent Recovery After Filling Several Large Canals - Michael Duever, Natural Ecosystems, Naples, FL
PowerpointCentral Everglades Planning Project: A Big Step Towards 'Getting the Water Right' - Kim Taplin, USACE, West Palm Beach, FL
PowerpointHydrologic and Ecologic Impacts from the CERP Indian River Lagoon- South Project - Gretchen Ehlinger, US Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District, Jacksonville, FL
PowerpointImproving the Indian River Lagoon by Restoring Flows in the St. Johns River? - David Watt, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL

Moderator - Heidi Moritz
US Army Corps of Engineers, Gresham, OR

PowerpointEvaluating the Magnitudes, Frequencies, and Effects of Coastal Total Water Levels - Heidi Moritz, US Army Corps of Engineers, Gresham, OR (co-author: K. White)
Comparing Actual Mean Sea Level Values and Trends to Projections - Heidi Moritz, US Army Corps of Engineers, Gresham, OR (co-author: M. Huber)
PowerpointPeak Flow Modification Due to Climate Change, Calculation Tool and Sub-regional Conclusions - Kaveh Zomorodi, Dewberry, Fairfax, VA

Moderator - Gregg Jones
Cardno, Tampa, FL

PowerpointEvaluation of Aquifer Storage and Recovery: Columbia River Off-Channel Aquifer Storage Project - Bruce Williams, GeoEngineers, Spokane, WA (co-author: G. Gregory)
PowerpointInfiltration Basin: an Alternative Recharge Method for El Paso's Managed Aquifer Recharge Program - Zhupng Sheng, Texas A&M University, El Paso, TX (co-authors: A. Shalamu, G. Miller, S. Reinert, B. Smith, O. Rodriguez)
PowerpointFrom Sea to (Water) Table - Quantifying Infrastructure Vulnerability Due to Sea Level Rise Impacts on Groundwater Levels in Coastal Florida - Peter Singhofen, Streamline Technologies, Inc., Winter Springs, FL (co-author: F. W. McKinnie)

Moderator - Michael Campana
Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

Panelists
Anthony G. Willardson, Western States Water Council, Murray, UT
PowerpointRobert J. Moresi, Past President, AWRA, Middleburg, VA
PowerpointRichard A. Engberg, Renewable Natural Resources Fdn., Bethesda, MD
Carol Wehle Howard, The Carol Group, Inc., Lake Placid, FL

What better way to spend time than listening to, and interacting with, three people who have distinguished themselves in the water world with over 130 years of combined experience in the governmental and private sectors? Each has seen much and done even more. Among other things, they will present their views on where water's been, where it is, and where it might be headed. Their perspectives range from the western USA (Tony Willardson), to Florida (Bob Moresi) to the USA as a whole (Dick Engberg). They'll interact with each other, moderator Michael E. Campana, and most importantly, the audience. All are raconteurs, so expect some tales! Richard A. Engberg retired in 2015 after nearly 16 years as Technical Director, AWRA. From 1990 to 1999 he served as Manager of the National Irrigation Water Quality Program of the U. S. Department of the Interior, Washington, DC. From 1962 to 1989, he was with the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) where his last position was Water Resources Division District Chief, Iowa District. He is a recipient of the Distinguished Service Award, the highest award of the Department of the Interior. From AWRA, he received the Henry P. Caulfield, Jr., Medal, the Icko Iben Award, the Fellow Member Award and the President's Award for Service. At present, he is Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Renewable Natural Resources Foundation. Robert J. Moresi is an astute observer of Florida water issues. He served ten years with three Florida Water Management Districts (WMDs) and 32 years in the private sector. During his WMD years he was heavily involved in developing and implementing regulatory programs including rulemaking, permitting, and giving expert testimony. As a consultant he worked with WMDs conducting water resources management studies, and provided permit support for private clients. He is a graduate of the University of South Florida, educated in groundwater hydrology and engineering. He is a registered Professional Geologist in several states. Bob has held all officer positions in the Florida Section and National AWRA, including the national presidency in 2004. Tony Willardson has been with the Western States Water Council (WSWC) since 1979 and as Executive Director since 2009. The WSWC is affiliated with the Western Governors' Association. He holds a BA in political science from Brigham Young University, and a MS in public administration from the University of Utah; and is a member of the National Honor Society for Public Affairs and Administration (Pi Alpha Alpha). He oversees publication of a weekly newsletter, Western States Water and has authored numerous articles and reports covering such issues as: water project financing and cost sharing, groundwater management and recharge, water conservation, drought, water use fees, remote sensing of water use and interregional water transfers. He co-authored the WGA's 2012 report, Water Transfers in the West: Projects, Trends, and Leading Practices in Voluntary Water Trading. Tony is one of the West's most perceptive and respected water leaders.

Wednesday / Nov. 16 / 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Concurrent Sessions 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48

Moderator - Brenda Batemen
Oregon Department of Water Resources, Salem, OR

Panelists
Glenn Terrell, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL
Lisa Engelman, Consultant, Rockville, MD
PowerpointAshley Hullinger , Arizona Water Resources Research Center, Tucson, AZ
PowerpointHarry Zhang, Water Environmental and Reuse Fdn., Alexandria, VA

The AWRA Policy Committee has analyzed case studies of municipal and state agencies' strategies for mitigation of high-flow and low-flow extremes in recognition that many of the decisions about managing extreme conditions are made and actions implemented by local-level and municipal agencies. The goal has been to identify ways in which the cases used policies, regulations, or management strategies to proactively address flood or drought problems faced by their particular regions. In 2013, the Policy Committee produced a report, "Proactive Flood and Drought Management: A Selection of Applied Strategies and Lessons Learned from Around the United States," presented at the November 2013 Water Resources Conference in Portland, OR. The committee presented lessons from its ongoing case study research at the November 2014 Annual Water Resources Conference in Vienna, VA, and the November 2015 Annual Water Resources Conference in Denver, CO, and published "Proactive Flood and Drought Management, Volume II" in 2016. In this session, the Policy Committee will discuss the AWRA Position Statement on Extreme Flows, based upon the findings of Volumes I and II, as well as the continuing research and progression of Volume III, focusing on drought/arid/low-flow strategies, including expanding the analysis beyond the United States. This panel presentation will describe the methods being used to prepare the Volume III report. AWRA's Policy Committee comprises water professionals and others with an interest in how public policy shapes our collective management of water resources. It is a diverse committee that includes scientists, educators, policy-makers, and other experts at all stages of their careers.

Moderator - John Windsor
Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL

PowerpointRethinking the Indian River Lagoon National Estuary Program (IRL NEP): Challenges and Opportunities for Enhanced Ecosystem Restoration and Management - Duane De Freese, Indian River Lagoon National Estuary Program, Sebastian, FL
Indian River Lagoon: Perfect Storm or New Norm - Charles Jacoby, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL (co-authors: M. Lasi, E. Phlips, R. Ellis, A. Simpson, J. Miller, L. Morris, R. Chamberlain, R. Brockmeyer, E. Hernandez)
Restoration and Resilience in the Indian River Lagoon: An Interactive Preface to a New Interdisciplinary Research Project - Linda Walters, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (co-authors: K. Kibler, T. L. Hawthorne, F. I. Rivera, L. G. Chambers, G. S. Cook)
PowerpointThe Indian River Lagoon Observatory Network of Environmental Sensors - Dennis Hanisak, FAU Harbor Branch, Fort Pierce, FL (co-authors: M. D. Hanisak, Kristen S. Davis, Jonathan Richardson, Bryan Botson, and John Hart)

Moderator - Robert McConnell
Tampa Bay Water, Clearwater, FL

PowerpointTampa Bay Water's Regional Drinking Water System and Environmental Resource Management Challenges - Robert McConnell, Tampa Bay Water, Clearwater, FL
PowerpointUse of Conceptual Models and Special Studies in Compliance Monitoring Frameworks - Robert Woithe, VHB, Tampa, FL (co-authors: D. Robison, M. Wessell)
PowerpointImportance of Model-Based Assessments for Compliance and Resource Protection - Michael Wessel, Janicki Environmental, St. Petersburg, FL (co-authors: T. Janicki, R. Woithe)
PowerpointLinking Watershed and Estuarine Monitoring for Integrated Resource Management - Doug Robison, ESA, Tampa, FL (co-author: R. McConnell)

Moderator - John C. Peck
University of Kansas School of Law, Lawrence Kansas, KS

Panelists
PowerpointRick Illgner, Edwards Aquifer Authority, San Antonio, TX
Advancing Environmental Mitigation with Financial Incentives to Achieve Compliance with the Endangered Species Act
Jakob Wiley, University of Oregon & Oregon State. University, Eugene, OR
Grassroots Groundwater Governance?: Examples from Oregon, Colorado, and California
PowerpointJohn C. Peck, University of Kansas School of Law, Lawrence, Kansas, KS
Background to the Kansas Limited Enhanced Management Areas (LEMAs)
PowerpointConstance Owen, Administrative Hearing Officer for the State of Kansas, Overland Park, KS
Kansas' First Voluntary Water Restriction Endeavor: the "Sheridan 6" Local Enhanced Management Area

Groundwater conservation can be achieved in part by restrictions on pumping. These restrictions may be imposed by the government, although they sometimes raise questions about the constitutionality of taking property rights without compensation. To overcome the "takings" problem, some governmental pumping restrictions involve payments to pumpers in exchange for agreements to reduce or stop pumping. Kansas has recently enacted legislation that enables groundwater users to reduce pumping voluntarily. This panel session will explore the continuum of restrictions, from imposed to voluntary programs.

Moderator - Katrin Bieger
Texas A&M AgriLife, Temple, TX

PowerpointIntroduction to SWAT+, A Completely Revised Version of the SWAT Model - Jeffrey Arnold, USDA, ARS, Temple, TX (co-authors: K. Bieger, M. J. White, H. Rathjens)
PowerpointSpatial Representation of Watershed Processes in SWAT+: Exploring New Capabilities of the Model - Katrin Bieger, Texas A&M AgriLife, Temple, TX (co-authors: H. Rathjens, J. G. Arnold)
Development of a National SWAT+ Model With Enhanced Landscape and Waterbody Connectivity - Mike White, USDA, ARS, Temple, TX
Recent Advances in using SWAT-MODFLOW to Simulate Hydrological Processes in River Basins - Ryan Bailey, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (co-authors: X. Wei, Seonggyu Park, H. Rathjens, K. Bieger, S. Abbas, A. Ajaaj)

Moderator - Mary Szafraniec
Amec Foster Wheeler, Tampa, FL

From Farm to (Water) Table - Modeling Hydroperiods for Complex Agricultural Wetland Restoration Projects - Peter Singhofen, Streamline Technologies, Inc., Winter Springs, FL (co-author: F. W. McKinnie)
Evaluating Internal Nutrient Loading in Waterbodies through Direct Measurement of Diffusive Sediment Nutrient Flux - Mary Szafraniec, Amec Foster Wheeler, Tampa, FL (co-authors: K. Deliz, S. J. Malone, R. M. Burnes)
PowerpointNecrosis in The Caloosahatchee Watershed and Lower San Carlos Bay: Using Computer Models to Compare the Effects of Precipitation Runoff to Lake Okeechobee Releases - Noah Zhang, Oxbridge Academy, West Palm Beach , FL (co-author: T. E. Thornton)


Wednesday / Nov. 16 / 10:30 AM - 12:00 Noon
Concurrent Sessions 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54

Moderator - Michael Thiemann
Riverside Technologies, Inc., Fort Collins, CO

PowerpointThe Community Rating System of FEMA's National Flood Insurance Program and Its Effects on Flood Mitigation Decisions at the Municipal Level: Case Studies in Florida and Pennsylvania - Michele Weitzel, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL (co-author: L. D. Duke)
The Socioeconomics of Floods and Flood Insurance: Toward Greater Understanding and Improved Decisions - Richard Pinkham, Booz Allen Hamilton, Arvada, CO
PowerpointCan the US Learn Lessons From Developing Countries to Increase Communities' Resilience to Coastal Flooding? - Darren Lumbroso, HR Wallingford, Wallingford, OX, United Kingdom (co-authors: R. Nicholls, N. Suckall, D. Lumbroso)
PowerpointAdvanced Forecasting for the New York State Canal System - A Collaborative Approach - Michael Thiemann, Riverside Technology, Inc., Fort Collins, CO (co-authors: H. Garsdal, M. Denno, D. Martin)

Moderator - Christopher Freeman
Smithsonian Marine Station, Ft. Pierce, FL

PowerpointReporting the Health of the Indian River Lagoon - Leesa Souto, Marine Resources Council, Palm Bay, FL (co-authors: C. Listopad, S. Stempel Housley)
PowerpointGeneral Survey and Grazing Characteristics of Infauna and Epifauna in the Northern Indian River Lagoon System - Christopher Freeman, Smithsonian Marine Station, Ft. Pierce, FL (co-authors: V. Paul, D. Janiak, J. Lunt, E. Galimany, R. Osman, K. Bayliss, K. Skura, M. Stephens, S. Reed)
Elephant in the Lagoon: Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Drift Macroalgae as related to an Extensive and Intensive Phytoplankton Bloom and Loss of Seagrass - Rex Ellis, SJRWMD, Palatka, FL (co-authors: L. Morris, R. Chamberlain, B. Riegl, A. Simpson, C. Jacoby)
Factors Contributing to a Massive Fish Kill in the Banana River, Florida as Revealed by Real-time-monitoring - Edith Widder, ORCA, Fort Pierce, FL (co-author: W. Falls)

Moderator - Daniel Hammond
Cardno, Riverview, FL

Restoration of Coastal Habitat Mosaics for Tampa Bay: The Rock Ponds Ecosystem Restoration Project - Brandt Henningsen, SWIM Program - SW Florida Water Management District, Tampa, FL (co-author: N. T. Norton)
Evaluating the Effectiveness of Streamside Vegetation as a Mitigation Technique to Reduce Aerially Applied Pesticide Loading to Streams - Jaclyn Hancock, Washington Department of Agriculture, Olympia, WA (co-authors: K. McLain, M. Bischof)
Numeric Nutrient Criteria: For Better or Worse... - Daniel Hammond, Cardno, Riverview, FL
Sanpoil Spill Response: A Rapid and Creative Approach to Protecting Water Resources - Bruce Williams, GeoEngineers, Spokane, WA

Moderator - Rafael E. Frias
Black & Veatch Corporation, Coral Springs, FL

Panelists
Brett Cyphers, Executive Director, Northwest Florida Water Management District, Havana, FL
Noah Valenstein, Executive Director, Suwannee River Water Management District, Live Oak, FL
Ann B. Shortelle, Executive Director, St. John's River Water Management District, Palatka, FL
Len Lindahl, Assistant Executive Director, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL
Brian Armstrong, Executive Director, Southwest Florida Water Management District, Brooksville, FL
Ryan Matthews, Director-Office of Water Policy, Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection, Tallahassee, FL

A panel session to discuss Florida's comprehensive and historic efforts with regards to water management, in support of Florida's water resources and the environment. The session will provide a state-wide overview of water management initiatives in Florida, as well as how these initiatives are implemented or enhanced by state's Water Management Districts.

Moderator - David Blodgett
U.S. Geological Survey, Middleton, WI

PowerpointBig Floods in Narrow and Wide Floodplains: A View Across Atlantic Slope Watersheds - Carolyn Plank, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (co-author: K. Prestegaard)
Hydrodynamic and Hydraulic Modeling to Assess Floodplain Impact and Bridge Scour Due to Replacement of Bridges - Chandy John, EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc., PBC, Hunt Valley, MD
Global Fresh Waters Flowing Fast and Slow - Scott Jasechko, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
PowerpointHydrologically-Determined Features: Subject of Repeated Study but Difficult to Positively Identify Between Studies - David Blodgett, U.S. Geological Survey, Middleton, WI

Moderator - Josefin Hirst
Hazen and Sawyer, Tampa, FL

Determination of Changes in Stream Quality as a Result of Stormwater Runoff from Selected Bridges in South Carolina - Celeste Journey, U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia, SC (co-authors: A. W. Caldwell, K. J. Conlon, W. F. Falls)
Strategic Planning & Stormwater Management: A Case Study - Andrew Smith, Black & Veatch, Kansas City, MO (co-author: L. Kellenberger)
An Onsite Wastewater Treatment Approach for Nitrogen Sensitive Watersheds - Josefin Hirst, Hazen and Sawyer, Tampa, FL (co-author: D. Anderson)
Pollutant Removal by Pervious Geopolymer Concrete Pavement Placed on Roadway Shoulders - Sangchul Hwang, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Mayaguez, PR (co-author: M. Jo)
Functional Pervious Concrete Pavement for Improvement of Livability, Safety and Water Sustainability - Marleisa Arocho Irizarry, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Mayaguez, PR (co-author: S. Hwang)

Wednesday / Nov. 16 / 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60

Moderator - Sandra Fox
St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL

PowerpointA Geospatial Model for Evaluating Time Series Based Inundation - Sandra Fox, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL (co-authors: S. Bourne, L. Spencer)
Advanced Forecasting for the New York State Canal System - Inundation Mapping and Data Dissemination - Bo Juza, DHI, Lakewood, CO (co-authors: A. Engelmann, S. Blake, C. Pedersen, C. Jenkins, D. Martin)
PowerpointRapid, Dynamic, and Real-Time Inundation Mapping for Emergency Management [and Planning] - Michael Thiemann, Riverside Technology, Inc., Fort Collins, CO (co-authors: J. Halgren, S. McFeely, J. Kastens)
Powerpoint'Connecting the Dots' - Solving the Real Time Flood Inundation Mapping Problem - Kurt Golembesky, NC Department of Public Safety, Division of Emergency Management, Raleigh, NC (co-authors: D. M. Key, J. C. Kirby)

Moderator - Charles Jacoby
St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL

Can Restored Oyster Reefs Enhance Biogeochemical Cycling in the Indian River Lagoon (FL)? - Lisa Chambers, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (co-authors: J. Heiland, S. Gaspar, J. Needham, C. Pilato, P. Sacks, L. Walters)
Applying Differences in Biogeochemically-Controlled Fluxes of Nitrogen and Phosphorus From Indian River Lagoon Sediments to Management Decisions About Dredging - Austin Fox, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL (co-authors: J. H. Trefry, R. P. Trocine, S. L. Fox)
Integrating Molecular and Flow-Cytometric Tools to Advance Monitoring of Bloom-Forming Nanoplanktonic Algae in the Indian River Lagoon - Katherine Hubbard, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Saint Petersburg , FL (co-authors: E. Muhlbach, C. Tilney, S. Murasko, S. Bruzek, S. Badylak, L. Hall, E. Phlips, M. Lasi, A. Corcoran )
PowerpointFreshwater Inflow and Sediment Type Influence Infaunal Community Assemblages in the St. Lucie Estuary - Jessica Lunt, Smithsonian Marine Station, Fort Pierce, FL (co-authors: M. Stephens, S. Reed, V. Paul)

Moderator - Scott Arends
Hanson Professional Services, Inc., Springfield, IL

Shell and Prairie Creek Reasonable Assurance Plan - Implementation of Resource Management Actions to Address Mineralized Impairment of Surface Waters - Lizanne Garcia, Southwest Florida Water Management District, Tampa, FL (co-authors: E. C. Dehaven, R. Starks, C. Wolden, C. Estes, D. Brumbaugh)
Emiquon: Restoring Wetlands with Greener, Gray Infrastructure - Scott Arends, Hanson Professional Services Inc., Springfield, IL
More than 50,000 Acres of Wetland Restoration and Protection in South FL - Charlene Stroehlen, Amec Foster Wheeler, Newberry, FL (co-authors: W. Tucker, J. Ryan, T. Davies)
Floodplain Restoration as a Nutrient, Sediment, and Stormwater BMP - Andrew Donaldson, JMT, York, PA (co-authors: S. Collins, F. Bubczyk , J. Morris)

Moderator - Joyce Zhang
South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

PowerpointLake Okeechobee Watershed Tributary Nutrient Loading Trends - Joyce Zhang, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL (co-authors: P. Burke, L. Baldwin, C. Mo, S. Hill)
PowerpointAssessing Nutrient Abatement Strategies in the 3.5 Million Acre Lake Okeechobee Watershed Using a GIS Based Model - Del Bottcher, Soil & Water Engineering Technology, Inc., Gainesville, FL (co-author: A. I. James)
Lake Okeechobee Water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Network - Patricia Burke, SFWMD, Okeechobee, FL
Using Agricultural Best Management Practices to Help Meet Environmental Goals - Bonnie Wolff Pelaez, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Ag Water Policy, Okeechobee, FL

Moderator - Hye Yeong Kwon
Center for Watershed Protection, Ellicott City, MD

Panelists
PowerpointMike Mitchell, EPA Region 4, Atlanta Federal Center, Atlanta, GA
William Hodgins, Center for Watershed Protection, Ellicott City, MD
PowerpointHye Yeong Kwon, Center for Watershed Protection, Ellicott City, MD

To practitioners, "gray" represents large pipe and concrete infrastructure for stormwater management and conventional engineering methods found in streets, piping, and stormwater design manuals. "Green" refers to a spectrum of practices and procedures for stormwater management that lead to water quality improvement and energy efficiencies. Green infrastructure can be accomplished through planning, zoning and ordinance, regulatory changes, engineering criteria, or the implementation of structural and non-structural practices. However, green infrastructure is frequently referenced as a narrower set of structural best management practices, as the most cost effective way to manage stormwater. Studies from around the country tout the benefits of such practices, but miss some of the non-traditional ones that are hard to put into either category. Mike Mitchell, Hye Yeong Kwon, and Bill Hodgins will discuss the benefits of the broader definition of green infrastructure and some of the cost effective tools that reside in both gray and green practices including: Provide case studies in the Chesapeake Bay and the Savannah River including a focus on Richmond, Virginia; Baltimore, MD; and Savannah, Georgia Give an update of major regulatory changes that have occurred in the Chesapeake Bay Discuss the benefits of stream restoration Discuss the application of better site design Detail new practices in Illicit discharge detection and elimination Provide new findings in research and regulation related to pet waste removal, gross solid management, and other non-structural practices Taking a point/ counterpoint approach, Mike the "Regulator," Hye Yeong the "Green Infrastructure Advocate," and Bill the "Engineer" will encourage audience participation in the discussion while presenting some interesting facts to support the various viewpoints.

Moderator - Celeste Journey
U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia, SC

Correlating Satellite Remote Sensing Data to Source Water Quality - Kinsey Hoffman, Hazen and Sawyer, Baltimore, MD (co-authors: J. Weiss, L. Wang, A. Mehta, M. McDonald, C. Lee)
Utilization of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle to Support Taste-and-Odor Assessments in a Drinking-Water Supply Reservoir in South Carolina - Celeste Journey, U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia, SC (co-authors: M. D. Petkewich, P. A. Conrads, J. M. Clark)
Addressing Nutrient Contamination of Tile Drainage Effluent with Denitrifying Woodchip Bioreactors in Cooler Climate Areas - Steve Sager, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Morden Research Ctr, Morden, Manitoba, Canada (co-authors: E. Derdall, D. Lapen, V. Rodd)
Quantification of the Herbicide Atrazine in the Canals of the Eastern Everglades and in the Caloosahatchee Watershed - Mingi Hong, Oxbridge Academy, West Palm Beach , FL (co-author: T. E. Thornton)


Wednesday / Nov. 16 / 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66

Moderator - Brad Hudgens
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, VA

PowerpointDevelopment and Testing of Alternate Forecast-Based Flood Operations Rules for West Point Lake, Georgia - Dan Sheer, HydroLogics Inc, Columbia, MD (co-authors: J. Schaake, S. Lebherz, W. Zeng)
PowerpointImproved Operations of Mohawk River Moveable Dams - Kenneth Avery, Bergmann Associates, Rochester, NY (co-authors: E. Herbst, M. Thiemann, J. Savoie)
PowerpointStatus and Challenges to Maximizing the Value from Operation of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Multi-purpose Reservoir Projects, an Integrated Water Resources Management Case Study - Brad Hudgens, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, VA
PowerpointAdvanced Forecasting for the New York State Canal System - Collaborative Hydraulic Model Development and On-site Testing - Matthew Denno, Gomez and Sullivan Engineers, DPC, Loudonville, NY (co-authors: M. Stottler, M. Thiemann, F. Hansen, T. A. McDonald)

Moderator - John Windsor
Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL

New Times, Needs and Tools for the Indian River Lagoon: Using in Situ, Continuous Monitoring to Enhance Understanding of a Shallow, Subtropical Estuary - Margaret Lasi, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL (co-authors: L. Hall, C. Akers, L. Peacock, E. Philips, C. Jacoby)
Bottom Up Controls of Recent Bloom Events in the Indian River Lagoon - Patrick Inglett, University of Florida, Gainesville , FL (co-authors: E. Philips, J. Papacek, S. Badylak, M. Lasi, C. Jacoby)
Identifying Potential Top-Down Control of Harmful Algae Among Zooplankton of the Indian River Lagoon Estuary - L. Holly Sweat, Department of Marine & Environmental Systems Florida Institute of, Melbourne, FL (co-authors: S. Badylak, C. A. Jacoby, K. B. Johnson, H. G. Kolb, X. Ma, E. J. Phlips, S. So, B. Stelling)
Using Site-Specific Watershed Loading Models to Inform Management Decisions at the Local Level: Case Studies Across the Indian River Lagoon Watershed - Claudia Listopad, Applied Ecology, Inc., Indian Harbour Beach, FL (co-author: E. Elevand)

Moderator - Valerie Seidel
Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL

Panelists
James G. Titus, U.S. EPA, Glenn Dale, MD
Craig E. Landry, Agricultural and Applied Economic, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Christopher de Bodisco, Stetson University, Deland, FL

This panel will address coastal erosion and sea level rise issues that vex engineers and frequently pit property owners against beachgoers. Engineering solutions often are available, but may have intangible costs associated with them. Coastal erosion can generate externalities such as generational shifts in property ownership, and loss of community identity relating to surfing or other shore-based activities. Sea level rise increasingly escalates costs to manage shifting beach fronts, as repairs become more frequent at shore-adjacent sites for both private property and public infrastructure. Published literature reflects loss of property values of more than 50% for beachfront homes where erosion is pronounced. Individual homeowners may face loss in value, while communities face loss of substantial revenues, as well as potentially their highest income residents. The implications for coastal zone management vary by community, based on wave energy, population density, topography, and other factors. Economic analysis of the difficult decisions facing coastal communities must consider location-specific aspects. This panel will include experts on strategies for managing sea level rise and coastal erosion, and the economic impacts that must be weighed and considered in infrastructure planning, design and policy. Examples from a variety of locations throughout the U.S and Australia will be discussed. Options ranged from seawall construction to land use changes to property buy-outs and elevation of infrastructure. The panel will discuss findings that are common across communities, as well as those that are community-specific. In each case, property location and value strongly influences the implications of public resources decisions. Areas with the most expensive properties have fewer options that are cost-feasible, as their breakeven point is higher. Similarly, areas of properties with proximity to amenities that the public values highly have more cost-feasible options. However, the set of options that are cost feasible changes under different scenarios of future erosion and sea level rise. In addition, the discount rates used in analysis demonstrate the importance of timing in coastal zone management decisions; options that require large capital or maintenance expenditures far in the future become more cost-feasible under higher discount rate assumptions, but shift more expense to future generations.

Moderator - Steffany Olson
South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

PowerpointEverglades, Ecosystem Changes, and the South Florida Water Management District's Nutrient Source Control Programs - Steffany Olson, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL
PowerpointNutrient Source Control Program in a 470,000 Acre Basin With Organic Soils - Thomas Davison, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL (co-authors: X. Pernett, J. Hansing, C. Bedregal)
PowerpointNutrient Source Control Program in a 170,000 Acre Basin With Sandy Soils - Carmela Bedregal, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach , FL (co-author: J. Hansing)

Research for Optimizing Phosphorus Reduction Using Agricultural Best Management Practices - Samira Daroub, University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL (co-author: T. Lang)

Moderator - John Pugh
Amec Foster Wheeler, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada

Panelists
Ignacio Lopez, Acciona Agua, British Columbia, Canada
Johanne Mullen, PWC, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Municipal and County Governments are committed to providing all residents with safe, clean drinking water and reliable, environmentally responsible treatment of waste water and associated byproducts. As part of government's responsibilities, upgrading and replacement of the infrastructure required to deliver water and wastewater treatment to citizens has become a key priority. With the downloading of financial responsibility associated with program delivery, coupled with the need to balance fiscal requirements and project delivery risks, municipalities are increasingly considering the P3 project delivery model for infrastructure projects of sufficient scope and scale. Under the public-private partnership (P3) arrangement, project risks (including design, construction, financing), and in some cases, operations and maintenance, are transferred to a private partner, who will bear responsibility for any cost overruns and delays. This session will describe procurement, finance and delivery models and how to engage the private sector for a successful P3 project delivery. This session will also review protocols and best practices for municipal and county governments to consider when procuring and delivering a P3 municipal infrastructure project along with their selected private sector partner. Attendees will gain insights to: * Why P3's work. * What is "risk transfer" in a P3. * When is P3 the right choice. * What is a "Value for Money Analysis". * Operational concessions and how they work. * Why is the private sector interested in P3.

Moderator - Sandra Walters
SWC, Key West, FL

PowerpointBenthic Monitoring of Three Coastal Rivers in West Central Florida - Chris Anastasiou, Southwest Florida Water Management District, Tampa, FL (co-author: B. Hasbrouck)
Celery Fields Regional Stormwater Facility- Multiple Use Management for Flood Control, Water Quality, Wildlife Habitat, Recreation, and Environmental Education - Ronald L. Van Fleet, VHB, University Park, FL
Water Quantity Management and Biological Health - Russel Frydenborg, Frydenborg EcoLogic, Tallahassee, FL (co-author: B. Frydenborg)
Restoration of a Valued Ecosystem Component, Vallisneria americana in the Caloosahatchee River & Estuary - David W. Ceilley, Johnson Engineering Inc., Fort Myers , FL (co-authors: E. M. Everham, III, C. E Henne, J. F. Anderson)


Thursday / Nov. 17 / 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Concurrent Sessions 67, 68, 69, 70, 71

Moderator - Kelly Mott Lacroix
U.S. Forest Service, Washington, DC

PowerpointThe Desert Flows Assessment and Database - A Gap Analysis and Tool for Understanding Environmental Water Needs in the Desert Watersheds of the United States and Mexico - Kelly Mott Lacroix, U.S. Forest Service, Washington, DC (co-authors: E. Tapia, A. Springer)
PowerpointThe National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and National Hydrography Dataset Plus (NHDPlus) - Alan Rea, U.S. Geological Survey, Boise, ID
PowerpointResults of the National Hydrography Requirements and Benefits Study - Stephen Aichele, U.S. Geological Survey, New Cumberland, PA (co-author: R. J. Viger)
PowerpointUSGS Water Availability and Use Science Program - Melinda Dalton, U.S. Geological Survey, Norcross, GA

Moderator - Anthony Comerio
Hanson Professional Services Inc., Springfield, IL

PowerpointMethodological Challenges in Integrated Spatial Analysis Across River Basins - Courtney Cooper, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID (co-authors: P. Edwards, J.D. Wulfhorst)
PowerpointDetection of Hydrologic Nonstationarities using Traditional and Emerging Statistical Change Point Detection Methods - Bryan Baker, USACE, Hanover, NH (co-authors: G. Villarini, D. Friedman, C. Mueller)
PowerpointUtilizing Unmanned Aircraft Systems (Drones) for Infrastructure Projects - Anthony Comerio, Hanson Professional Services Inc., Springfield, IL
PowerpointFloodplain Habitat Area Analysis Using GIS - Ravi Nalamothu, HSW Engineering, Inc., Tampa, FL (co-authors: K. Watson, D. Sabeh, N. Lewis)

Moderator - Ibrahim Alameddine
American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon

Hydrologic and Water Quality Modeling of a Complex Agricultural Watershed - Yogesh Khare, Everglades Foundation, Palmetto Bay, FL (co-author: M. Naja)
A Three-Year Study on the Health Effects of Glyphosate on Vegetation in the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge Cypress Swamp and Strazzulla Marsh - Phoebe Stirm, Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches and Sewanee: The University, West Palm Beach, FL (co-authors: T. E. Thornton, M. Ridgway)
PowerpointSWAT Application for Developing a Credit Estimation Method for Precision Agriculture - Andrew Fang, Kieser & Associates, Kalamazoo, MI (co-authors: J. Klang, A. Sorensen )
Developing a Robust Probabilistic-Based Water Quality Index: A Step Forward Towards a Transparent and Geographically Regionalisable Assessment of Surface Water Quality Impairments - Ibrahim Alameddine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon (co-authors: A. Chamseddine,) M. A. Masoud, M. El-Fadel)

Moderator - Jennifer E. Clemente
Florida Department of Health Sarasota County, Venice, FL

PowerpointEvidence-based Guidelines for Microbial Source Tracking Projects - James Herrin, Source Molecular Corporation, Miami, FL
Bacteria Monitoring in Near-Shore Waters at Florida Beaches: Case Studies of Frequency and Duration of High-Bacteria Events - L. Donald Duke, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL (co-authors: A. K. Will, C. L. Tretter)
Quantitative Relationship between Environmental Factors and Bacteria in Near-Shore Marine Waters, Sarasota County, FL - Jennifer Clemente, FL Dept of Health in Sarasota County, Venice, FL (co-author: L. D. Duke)
PowerpointAssessment of Bacteria Sources Allocation and Conservation Practices for Water Quality Enhancement in Arroyo Colorado Using SWAT Model - Jaehak Jeong, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Temple, TX (co-author: Y. Her)
Continuous Monitoring for Harmful Algal Blooms - Stephanie A. Smith, YSI, Yellow Springs, OH

Moderator - Catherine Katsikis
LDCFL, Inc., Royal Palm Beach, FL

Maintaining Data Quality in Planning, Field, Laboratory and Validation Processes: The Lifeline to Sound and Cost Effective Decision Making - Catherine Katsikis, LDCFL, Inc., Royal Palm Beach, FL (co-authors: R. Terhune)
Maintaining Data Quality in Planning, Field, Laboratory and Validation Processes: The Lifeline to Sound and Cost Effective Decision Making - John Moorman, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL
Maintaining Data Quality in Planning, Field, Laboratory and Validation Processes: The Lifeline to Sound and Cost Effective Decision Making - Kimberly Kostzer, The Coca Cola Company, Atlanta, GA
Maintaining Data Quality in Planning, Field, Laboratory and Validation Processes: The Lifeline to Sound and Cost Effective Decision Making - Keith Kibbey, Lee County Division of Natural Resources, Fort Myers, FL


Thursday / Nov. 17 / 10:30 AM - 12:00 Noon
Concurrent Sessions 72, 73, 74, 75, 76

Moderator - Moshen Sherif
United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, UAE

PowerpointPlanning for Water Infrastructure Resilience - Pamela Kenel, Black & Veatch, Gaithersburg, MD (co-authors: A. Ozman, S. Bieber, J. Nightingale)
Assessing Brackish Groundwater as a Resource for the Nation - Jennifer Stanton, U.S. Geological Survey, Lincoln, NE (co-authors: D. W. Anning, C. J. Brown, R. B. Moore, V. L. McGuire, S. L. Qi, A. Harris, K. F. Dennehy, P. B. McMahon, J. R. Degnan, J. Karl Bhlke)
PowerpointEmbracing Uncertainty as the New Norm: A Risk-Based Portfolio Approach for Urban Water Investment Planning - Chengyan Zhang, Hawksley Consulting, Washington , DC (co-author: J. Briscoe)
Improving Public-Supply Water-Use Estimates for the United States Through a Tracking Database - Nancy Barber, U.S. Geological Survey, Norcross, GA
PowerpointMitigation of Seawater Intrusion using Subsurface Intakes of Desalination Plants - Mohsen Sherif, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, UAE (co-authors: A.Javadi, A. Shetty)

Moderator - Michael Eberle
USDA Forest Service, Washington, DC

PowerpointA Comparison of LID Regulatory Drivers and Implementation in China with the EU and the USA - David Powers, HR Wallingford, Ashland, VA (co-authors: B. Woods-Ballard, H. Udale-Clarke, V. Dou)
PowerpointDesigning Low Impact Development Treatment Systems for Agricultural Environments - Steven Trinkaus, Trinkaus Engineering, LLC, Southbury, CT
PowerpointUnited States Forest Service National Best Management Practices (BMP's) Program Development and Implementation - Michael Eberle, USDA - Forest Service, Washington, DC

Moderator - Robert Sabo
ORISE Fellow, Office of Research and Development, US EPA, Arlington, VA

PowerpointInvestigation of the Impacts of Local-Scale Hydrogeological Conditions on Sinkhole Occurrence in East-Central Florida, USA - Han Xiao, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (co-authors: Y. Kim, B. Hyun Nam, D. Wang)
PowerpointAssessing the Role of Changing Cropland Nitrogen Use Efficiency and Clean Air in Decreasing TN Export in Three Mixed Land Use Watersheds - Robert D. Sabo,ORISE Fellow, Office of Research and Development, U.S. EPA, Arlington, VA
PowerpointUse Subsurface Altitude and Groundwater Level Variations to Estimate Land Subsidence in Choushui River Alluvial Fan, Taiwan - Ya-Yun Zheng and Jet-Chau Wen, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yun, Taiwan (co-authors: L. Hong-Ru, C. Yong-Lin, H. Shao-Yang, J. Y. Tian-Chyi, W. Jet-Chau)
PowerpointEstimations of the Heterogeneity Hydrogeological Parameters In-Situ Recovery Tests with the Use of Hydraulic Tomography - Yu-Lun Huang and Jet-Chau Wen, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yun, Taiwan (co-authors: C. Yong-Lin, L. Hong-Ru, H. Shao-Yang, J. Y. Tian-Chyi, W. Jet-Chau )
Powerpoint'Art of the Possible' Innovative New Approach to Measuring, Processing and Visualizing Your River to Tell the Entire Story. A Picture is Worth a 1000 Words. - John Sloat, WaterCube, Daniel Island, SC (co-authors: S. Banjavcik, T. Schmidt)

Moderator - Maia McGuire
University of Florida/IFAS Extension, Bunnell, FL

A panel discussion will follow these three presentations.

PowerpointFlorida Microplastic Awareness Project: A Citizen Science Initiative - Maia Mcguire, UF/IFAS Extension, Bunnell, FL
PowerpointThe Story of Microplastics in Lake Michigan: Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant's Role in Research, Education, and Outreach - Sarah Zack, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, Chicago, IL (co-authors: L. Kammin, T. Hoellein, J. Kelly, S. Mason)
PowerpointMicroplastics in Tampa Bay: Abundance, Spatial and Temporal Variability - David Hastings, Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, FL (co-authors: K. Sharp, C. Hansen, K. McEachern)

Moderator - Samuel Palermo
Gannett Fleming, West Palm Beach, FL

Groundwater Discharge along the Southern California Coast; - John Jansen, Leggette Brashears and Graham, West Bend, WI
Detecting Seepage and Leaks Using Simple, 'Low-Tech' Geophysical Methods - Richard Lee, Gannett Fleming, Inc., Phoenixville, PA (co-author: R. Lee)
Reducing Uncertainties when Evaluating Large Levee Systems - Michael Cox, Gannett Fleming, West Palm Beach, FL (co-author: T. Harper)


Thursday / Nov. 17 / 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 77, 78, 79, 80, 81

Moderator - Yung-Hsin Sun
MWH Global, Inc., Sacramento, CA

Systems Analysis of Local Water Use in Los Angeles - Erik Porse, UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, Los Angeles, CA (co-author: S. Pincetl)
PowerpointWater Supply Reliability Planning in a Smoking Hot Water Transfer Market - Yung-Hsin Sun, MWH Global, Inc., Sacramento, CA (co-authors: I. Khadam, V. Nishikawa)
PowerpointStrategic Sustainability Planning for Utilities - Rafael Frias III, Black & Veatch, Coral Springs, FL (co-author: J. Stiles)
PowerpointPredicting Homeowner Satisfaction and Long-Term Use of Smart Irrigation Controllers - Maria Morera, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (co-authors: P. Monaghan, M.Dukes, E. Breder)
PowerpointAdvancing Drought Monitoring and Outlook for Sustainable Water Resources Management in a Changing Climate - Jae Ryu, University of Idaho, Boise, ID

Moderator - Lindsey Yaserer
USDA Agricultural Research Service, Oxford, MS

PowerpointImpact of Urban South Platte River Habitat Improvements on Native Warm Water Fish Populations - Jordan Parman, Metro Wastewater Reclamation District, Denver, CO
Environmental Performance of a Coupled Livestock-Crop Water Recycle System - Yiwen Chiu, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA
Assessing the Integrated Impact of Riparian Buffers, Ponds, and Ephemeral Gullies on Pollutant Loads in Goodwin Creek Watershed using AnnAGNPS - Lindsey Yasarer, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Oxford, MS (co-authors: R. Bingner, H. Momm, R. Emiliare, B. Barkdoll, J.R. Rigby, R. Wells, S. Dabney)
Quantifying the Impact of Willow on Evapotranspiration in the Upper St. Johns River Marshes, Florida, USA - Yin Tang, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (co-authors: D. Wang, J. E. Fauth, P. F. Quintana- Ascencio, D. Hall, K. Ponzio)

Moderator - Jason Doll
Moffatt & Nichol, Raleigh, NC

PowerpointDeveloping Bathymetry Data using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) - Mitch Wainwright, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL (co-author: M. Daly)
PowerpointHydroacoustic 3D Velocity Data Collection and Mapping in Support of Dynamic Systems Modeling on the Silver River, Florida - Ed Carter, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL
Modeling Seepage and Infiltration Losses Following a Levee Breach - Peter Singhofen, Streamline Technologies, Inc., Winter Springs, FL (co-author: F. W. McKinnie)

Moderator - Sandra Fox
St. Johns River Water Management, Palatka, FL

PowerpointAdvancements in LiDAR-derived DEMs - Sandra Fox, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL (co-authors: P. Finer, S. Speaks, K. Adames, K. Patterson)
A New Competitor in 2D Modeling: Complex Comparison of HEC-RAS 5.0 and AdH - Scott Arends, Hanson Professional Services Inc., Springfield, IL
Implementation of Environmental Flows in Poorly Gauged Regions: a Framework for Flow Prediction with Minimum Hydrological Data - Mohammadhossein Alipour, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (co-author: K. Kibler)
PowerpointDeriving Discharge with Quantified Uncertainty Using Index Velocity Observations: A Probabilistic Machine Learning Approach - Touraj Farahmand, Aquatic Informatics, Vancouver, BC, Canada (co-author: S. Hamilton)

Moderator - Robert Mason
U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA

There will be two presentations followed by a panel format.

USGS Flood Warning Talks - Robert Mason, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA (co-author: M. Peppler)
Public Outreach and Automated High Water Alarm Distribution - David Curtis, WEST Consultants, Folsom, CA


Thursday / Nov. 17 / 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 82, 83, 84, 85, 86

Moderator - David Lampert
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK

PowerpointAnalysis of Water Consumption Associated with Hydroelectric Power Generation in the United States - David Lampert, School of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK
PowerpointMapping the Energy Footprint of Produced Water Management in New Mexico - Katie Zemlick, University of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM (co-authors: E. Kalhor, J. Chermak, B. M.Thomson, V. C. Tidwell, E. J. Sullivan-Graham)
PowerpointThe Role of Water in North Slope, Alaska, Oil and Gas Exploration, Development, and Operations - Michael Lilly, GW Scientific, Fairbanks, AK (co-author: R. Paetzold)
PowerpointEstimating the Wave Power Potential in Coastal Regions of Florida - Cigdem Ozkan, CECE, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (co-author: T. Mayo)
Development of WEAP Model for Assessment of Water Efficient Technologies in Power Generation Sector - Nikhil Agrawal, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada (co-authors: M. Ahiduzzaman, A. Kumar)

Moderator - Chris Brown
University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL

PowerpointIdentifying and Eliminating Barriers to Living Shorelines in the South Atlantic Region - Jason Doll, Moffatt & Nichol, Raleigh, NC
PowerpointLiving Shorelines to Control Nonpoint Source Pollution and as a Tool for Public Education along the Mosquito Lagoon - Philip Bellamy, Bethune-Cookman University, Daytona Beach, FL (co-authors: A. Orozco, H. Jung Cho)
Catalyzing Landscape Scale Restoration in Urban and Agricultural Communities - Bruce Roll, Clean Water Services, Hillsboro, OR (co-author: R. Hunter)
PowerpointEvaluation of a Large-scale Pilot Water Farm Project in South Florida, USA - Chris Brown, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL

Moderator - Eric Swain
U.S. Geological Survey, Davie, FL

PowerpointSimulating the Lower St. Johns River for Combined Extreme Events - Jacob Fuller, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL (co-authors: K.Gruber, J. Nyberg, P. Bacopoulos, C. J. Brown)
PowerpointReal-Time Evaluation Tools Using the Everglades Depth Estimation Network (Eden) - Eric Swain, U.S. Geological Survey, Davie, FL, presenting for Paul Conrads, USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, Columbia, SC (co-authors: B. McCloskey, R. Fike)
PowerpointDevelopment and Application of a Three-Dimensional Model for Vegetated Channel Flows - Yanfeng Zhang, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL
PowerpointNorth Florida-Southeast Georgia Model: A Critical Tool for Water Supply Planning in North Florida - Fatih Gordu, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, FL (co-authors: D. Durden, T.Grubbs, R. Basso)

Moderator - Michael Campana
Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

PowerpointEffects of Agricultural Conservation on Water Quality in the Western Lake Erie Basin - Santhi Chinnasamy, Texas A&M Unviersity-lackland Research Center, Temple, TX (co-authors: CEAP team)
PowerpointIncorporating Conservation Management into a Future Bioenergy Cropping System in Iowa River Basin: A Water Quality Evaluation - Miae Ha, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL (co-authors: M. Wu)
SESSION 86: JAWRA - Writing a Great Article

Powerpoint   Powerpoint

Moderator - Parker J. Wigington
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of the American Water Resources Association
Redding, CA

Jim Wigington, JAWRA Editor-in-Chief, will present insights and practical steps to successfully publishing in water-related technical journals. Topics will include: defining the scope and content of a paper, who should be an author or coauthor, selecting a journal, effective writing, wise use of figures and tables, navigating the peer review process, and ways to make your journal article more visible. Ample time will be allotted for discussion of these and related topics.

 

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